Biodiversity

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  • No Finish Line - a fascinating new book on birding ( and more)

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    24 Apr 2015 | 1:47 pm
    Hot off the presses is this excellent book that all birders will enjoy devouring. It is the biography of Dr. Bernard Master, renowned world birder, conservationist, physician, and businessman. In the interest of full disclosure, Bernie is a good friend, but that relationship would not, I believe, cloud my opinion of his first foray into the literary world.I've just received my copy of No Finish Line (subtitled Discovering the World's Secrets One Bird at a Time), and have only had a chance to skim through, look at the some 140 photographs, and read select passages. Trust me, if you are a…
  • Washington State Turns to Neurotoxins to Save Its Oysters

    CBD News Headlines
    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Six decades ago, when Dick Sheldon first got into the oyster business, the tide flats of Washington states Willapa Bay were almost free of blight. There were no crabs (well, almost none) and Sheldon used to hike onto the mud at low tide, with a bucket for oysters
  • The Race: The Blog Returns with a Science Update

    Island Biodiversity Race
    islandbiodiversityrace
    1 Apr 2015 | 3:49 pm
    “The Race” has been silent for a while; a sabbatical accompanied by computer glitches at both sites (Wildlifedirect.org; calacademy.org) led to it, but this was not meant to signal a pause in our island work by any means! We will be returning to the islands for two more expeditions later this year. During the past nine months or so, some important scientific papers have been published by expedition members; these continue to illustrate the unique nature of the island fauna and flora. Ricka Stoelting (D. Lin phot, GGI) Ricka Stoelting was on the islands for a solid two months…
  • Officials: Sumatran rhino is extinct in the wild in Sabah

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Jeremy Hance
    23 Apr 2015 | 12:15 pm
    There are no Sumatran rhinos left in the wild in the Malaysian state of Sabah, confirmed Masidi Manjun, the Tourism, Culture and Envi­ronment Minister, over the weekend. In 2008, conservationists estimated there were around 50 rhinos in the state. Five years later, it dropped that estimate to just ten. Now, it's admitted the awful truth: the wild rhino is very likely gone.
  • Tue 28 Apr 2015: 2pm @ SR2 – Lee Bee Yan on the spider crabs of Singapore

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    22 Apr 2015 | 9:26 am
    Qualifying Exam “The spider crabs of Singapore, and a revision of Hyastenus White, 1847, and Rochinia A. Milne-Edwards, 1875 (Majoidea: Epialtidae: Pisinae)” Ms Lee Bee Yan Graduate Student, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore Tue 28 Apr 2015: 2.00pm Seminar Room 2 (S2,04-15) Department of Biological Sciences Supervisor: Prof Peter Ng K L Co-Supervisor:  Dr Ng Ngan Kee   All are welcome Abstract Majoid crabs are a group of widely distributed crustaceans, with a total of six families. This project is in three main parts. Firstly, there has not…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • No Finish Line - a fascinating new book on birding ( and more)

    24 Apr 2015 | 1:47 pm
    Hot off the presses is this excellent book that all birders will enjoy devouring. It is the biography of Dr. Bernard Master, renowned world birder, conservationist, physician, and businessman. In the interest of full disclosure, Bernie is a good friend, but that relationship would not, I believe, cloud my opinion of his first foray into the literary world.I've just received my copy of No Finish Line (subtitled Discovering the World's Secrets One Bird at a Time), and have only had a chance to skim through, look at the some 140 photographs, and read select passages. Trust me, if you are a…
  • Return of the butterflies

    22 Apr 2015 | 2:16 pm
    The warming of spring brings out a new crop of butterflies, and their appearance is much welcomed by many, including your narrator. These stunning male Eastern Tiger Swallowtails, Papilio glaucus, are fresh and unblemished. I photographed them on a recent sunny day in southern Ohio, the duo was among dozens that I saw.Try as I might, this female American Lady, Vanessa virginiensis, would not fully cooperate with my camera. It's a semi-wary species to begin with, but this girl was busy. She was scrambling about the pussy-toes, which is this species' host plant, depositing eggs, and I…
  • Life along (and in) a creek

    19 Apr 2015 | 6:53 pm
    Yesterday was a great spring day to be afield, and I was fortunate enough to be invited to help lead an outing organized by the Ohio Chapter of The Nature Conservancy. Our destination was a new TNC preserve along the banks of Little Darby Creek in Madison County. As there is no ready access as of yet, the preserve is not open to the public at this time which precludes me from identifying the site. Interest was high in this foray - organizers cut it off at 38 participants. We divided into two camps, and went our separate ways, exploring the preserve's hidden nooks and crannies. My thanks…
  • Dennis Profant, 1956-2015

    15 Apr 2015 | 11:41 am
    I learned today of the death of one of Ohio's premier naturalist/biologists, Dennis Profant. The news was a shock to all, and his passing yesterday was terrible news.Dennis was a professor at Hocking College, where he taught ornithology, dendrology, and entomology. He really was a jack-of-all-trades when it came to natural history knowledge, but he was probably best known for his encyclopedic knowledge of moths. Dennis published extensively on the Lepidoptera, especially his beloved slug caterpillar moths (Limacodidae). He was lead author of the definitive work on these gorgeous little…
  • If I could be a bird...

    12 Apr 2015 | 4:53 pm
    There are many avian harbingers of spring, but my favorite is the plucky Tree Swallow. Their return to northern marshes is a sure sign that winter's grip is weakening. In Ohio, the first scout swallows might appear by late-February. They are sure to be greeted by by crusts of ice, and the certain prospect of enduring several more freezes and nasty bouts of weather courtesy of an Old Man Winter who doesn't want to let go.As the days lengthen and temperatures become decidedly milder, more swallows sweep north in their great seasonal occupation of marshes in the northern U.S. and Canada. Tree…
 
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    CBD News Headlines

  • Washington State Turns to Neurotoxins to Save Its Oysters

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Six decades ago, when Dick Sheldon first got into the oyster business, the tide flats of Washington states Willapa Bay were almost free of blight. There were no crabs (well, almost none) and Sheldon used to hike onto the mud at low tide, with a bucket for oysters
  • Worth saving: landscapes we don't want to lose to climate change

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    As Earth Day turns 45, share your story about the natural or urban landscape you most want to save. The most compelling submissions will be featured in a Guardian video Climate change isn't the future. It's happening now and threatening some of the most remarkable ecosystems on the planet.
  • Biodiversity promotes multitasking in ecosystems

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    A new study of the complex interplay between organisms and their environment shows that biodiversity - the variety of organisms living on Earth - is even more important to the healthy functioning of ecosystems than previously thought.
  • Jaws meets kangaroo? Rare, cute pocket shark found

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Think Jaws meets a kangaroo, with maybe a touch of cute kitten, and you've got the aptly named pocket shark - the newest and rarest species found off the U.S. coast.
  • Soundscapes offer clues about coral reef communities

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    They made recordings of ambient noises at 42 reef sites at three different times of day, and compared these to habitat and fish community surveys taken at the same time.
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    Island Biodiversity Race

  • The Race: The Blog Returns with a Science Update

    islandbiodiversityrace
    1 Apr 2015 | 3:49 pm
    “The Race” has been silent for a while; a sabbatical accompanied by computer glitches at both sites (Wildlifedirect.org; calacademy.org) led to it, but this was not meant to signal a pause in our island work by any means! We will be returning to the islands for two more expeditions later this year. During the past nine months or so, some important scientific papers have been published by expedition members; these continue to illustrate the unique nature of the island fauna and flora. Ricka Stoelting (D. Lin phot, GGI) Ricka Stoelting was on the islands for a solid two months…
  • THE RACE: GULF OF GUINEA VIII NEARS COMPLETION

    islandbiodiversityrace
    29 Apr 2014 | 11:55 am
    Our eighth expedition has been a very different one; except for GG V this has been our only all-education mission.  Readers will recall that our biodiversity awareness program began in 2010 when we assessed the curriculum for biology in school across both islands. Then we began annual distribution of educational materials to a cohort of 2,000 third graders in widely separated schools on both islands.  These kids are now in the fifth grade and will move on to different schools next year, so this has been our last meeting with them. Below are a series of images of our activities over the past…
  • The Race: The Amphibians of Sao Tome and Principe, and the Expeditionion

    islandbiodiversityrace
    5 Mar 2014 | 1:59 pm
    The Biodiversity Education team has been hard at work on our product for GG VIII, of April, 2014.  The 2000 students we have been visiting since the 3rd grade are now in the 5th grade and will be moving on next year, so this is our last visit with them.  We have produced a slightly more technical biodiversity booklet (livreto) for each of them. This cohort represents slightly more than 35% of the island studentsin their age group.  NOSSAS PLANTAS  E ANIMAIS ESPECIAIS The Bio-education team in my Lab: Roberta Ayers (senior educator, and translation – on Skype), Velma Schnoll (Project…
  • The Race: Another New Species and Contributions from our Citizen Scientists

    islandbiodiversityrace
    10 Dec 2013 | 4:12 pm
    Colleagues in London, Drs. Simaikis and Edgecombe of the Natural History Museum, have just published a paper on centipedes that includes some very old specimens from São Tomé and Príncipe collected as early as the 1930’s.  Among the material, they discovered a new. presumably endemic species. Meet Otostigmus coltellus (left), from Zootaxa 3734 (2013). For scientific purposes, only the parts of the animal that are important for identification are published; the photo on the right  (RCD phot – GG II) may or may not be an Otostigmus but it would look something like this.  I am told…
  • The Race: GG VII Potpourri and the World’s Largest Reptile

    islandbiodiversityrace
    2 Aug 2013 | 2:05 pm
    Much has happened since my last post from the islands a couple of months ago which accounts for the tardiness of this one. However, Rayna Bell, our Cornell PhD candidate did manage to post two videos via National Geographic while we were on the islands. I was invited to speak in TEDxSão Tomé, a great honor, and so returned in mid-June.  Readers should know that there is but one TAP flight to the islands per week via Lisbon so this is no small undertaking especially for a single lecture.  TEDx was a wonderful experience, and I was able to meet with some the brightest young people from the…
 
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Officials: Sumatran rhino is extinct in the wild in Sabah

    Jeremy Hance
    23 Apr 2015 | 12:15 pm
    There are no Sumatran rhinos left in the wild in the Malaysian state of Sabah, confirmed Masidi Manjun, the Tourism, Culture and Envi­ronment Minister, over the weekend. In 2008, conservationists estimated there were around 50 rhinos in the state. Five years later, it dropped that estimate to just ten. Now, it's admitted the awful truth: the wild rhino is very likely gone.
  • Photo essay: the flying fox show

    Jeremy Hance
    22 Apr 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Rain or clear, wind or still, full moon or no. Every night thousands of flying foxes rise from a small mangrove island among the lesser Sunda islands of Indonesia. Around sunset the Sunda flying fox begin to stir in their roots—their stomachs waking them—until the boldest among them takes off into the sky.
  • Killings of environmental activists jumped by 20 percent last year

    Jeremy Hance
    20 Apr 2015 | 12:31 pm
    The assassination, murder, and extrajudicial killing of environmental activists rose by 20 percent last year, according to a new grim report by Global Witness. The organization documented 116 killings in 2014 across 17 countries with the highest number in Brazil, which saw 29 environmental and land defenders killed.
  • Your name here: auctioning the naming rights to new species to fund conservation

    Brittany Stewart
    17 Apr 2015 | 1:09 pm
    Meg Lowman is on a mission to save northern Ethiopia's church forests, one at a time. Numbering around 3,500, these small "sacred" patches of forest surrounding churches are isolated natural oases in Ethiopia's otherwise mostly agricultural terrain, and they are losing ground to human activity at an alarming rate. Church forests are considered critical conservation areas. They are home to hundreds of species found nowhere else in the world, with new discoveries still being made.
  • Photo Essay: Geopolitical pawns, the fishermen of Lý Sơn, Vietnam

    Tiffany Roufs
    17 Apr 2015 | 9:41 am
    'When they came, what could we do?' 46-year-old fisherman Nguyên Phú asks, crouching down like a frog with his hands above his head. 'We just put our hands up like this, and said, 'Don't shoot! Don't shoot!'' Their caution is warranted. If they venture too deeply into Vietnam's claimed territorial waters, a Chinese patrol boat will swoop down on them.
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Tue 28 Apr 2015: 2pm @ SR2 – Lee Bee Yan on the spider crabs of Singapore

    otterman
    22 Apr 2015 | 9:26 am
    Qualifying Exam “The spider crabs of Singapore, and a revision of Hyastenus White, 1847, and Rochinia A. Milne-Edwards, 1875 (Majoidea: Epialtidae: Pisinae)” Ms Lee Bee Yan Graduate Student, Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore Tue 28 Apr 2015: 2.00pm Seminar Room 2 (S2,04-15) Department of Biological Sciences Supervisor: Prof Peter Ng K L Co-Supervisor:  Dr Ng Ngan Kee   All are welcome Abstract Majoid crabs are a group of widely distributed crustaceans, with a total of six families. This project is in three main parts. Firstly, there has not…
  • Tue 21 Apr 2015: 11am – Ng Shengrong on “Influence of Pleistocene climate change on patterns of gene flow across the avifauna of Wallacea”

    otterman
    21 Apr 2015 | 1:34 am
    Qualifying Examination “Influence of Pleistocene climate change on patterns of gene flow across the avifauna of Wallacea” Nathaniel Ng Shengrong Graduate Student, Department of Biological Sciences National University of Singapore Tuesday 21 April 2015: 11.00am Seminar Room 1 (S2-0414) Supervisor: Asst Prof Rheindt, Frank Erwin Abstract – Wallacea hosts extremely high levels of vertebrate endemism and is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading biodiversity hotspots. One of the primary mechanisms leading to the rich biodiversity of the region is its complex earth…
  • Remembering Dr Ong Bee Lian, lecturer, mentor and friend

    otterman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:44 pm
    When we shared the passing of Dr Ong Bee Lian, I was very touched by the comments many former students made in response to the news. They spoke of her lecturing, nurturing mentorship and kindness. I made a general call and thanks to former students from over two decades (1991 – 2011), this aspect of her life is shared and remembered. Over the years, I had witnessed her dedication to module matching and placement of students on the exchange programme. More recently, I was able to appreciate very much her strong support for fairness, respect and trust for students when we worked on an…
  • Dr Ong Bee Lian’s Memorial – Mon 20 April 2015: 4.00pm @ LT 32

    otterman
    19 Apr 2015 | 6:19 pm
    Dr Teresa Ong Bee Lian Born in Singapore on 16 September 1957 Passed away in Singapore on 23 March 2015 Aged 57 years Always remembered by family and loved ones. From Paul Thomas Matsudaira (Head, Biological Sciences) 
 Subject: Dr Ong Bee Lian’s Memorial – 20 April 2015 at 4.00 p.m., LT 32
  “Dear Faculty, Staff and Students,   The department is planning a memorial for Dr Ong Bee Lian  on Monday, 20 April 2015 at 4 pm in LT32 and all are invited to attend. Her family members will also be present.   She was a long standing member of the department from the time she was a…
  • Thu 16 Apr 2015: 3.00pm – Joshua Koh on “The ecology and management of Sus scrofa vittatus in CCNR”

    otterman
    9 Apr 2015 | 3:47 am
    NUS DBS Qualifying Exam The ecology and management of Sus scrofa vittatus in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve of mainland Singapore Joshua Koh Jun Min Graduate Student, Dept. of Biological Sciences, NUS Thu 16  April 2015: 3.00pm      Conference Room 2 S1, Level 3, mezzanine (access via S2-03) Department of Biological Sciences Science Drive 4 National University of Singapore Supervisor: David Bickford Abstract – The banded pig, Sus scrofa vittatus, in the absence of natural predators and hunting pressures, is hypothesized to be hyper-abundant within Singapore’s forests.
 
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • BHL and The Field Museum rapid inventory team: joining forces for conservation action

    23 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    In 1855, after an exhausting trip across the Amazon, botanist Richard Spruce reached the Escalera Mountains of northern Peru. "I am among magnificent scenery and an interesting vegetation," he wrote.In 2013, botanist Corine Vriesendorp went back to those same mountains—still remote, still magnificent, and essentially unexplored since Spruce. "Stunningly beautiful," she wrote. "…breath-taking vistas of mountains, cliffs, waterfalls, and the Amazon lowlands."Spruce worked out of a place that looked like this:Vriesendorp and her colleagues worked out of a place that looked like this:In the…
  • BHL participates in the GBIF-CoL-EOL-BHL-BOLD Summit at Naturalis

    22 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    Jeroen Snijders, Bob Corrigan, Peter Schalk, Donald Hobern, Tom Orrell, David Remsen, Alex Borisenko, Alex Borisenko, Martin KalfatovicOn 13 April 2015, BHL Program Director Martin R. Kalfatovic attended the GBIF-CoL-EOL-BHL-BOLD Summit at Naturalis in Leiden, Netherlands. This meeting followed on the preceding Catalogue of Life meeting in Oostende, Belgium. The meeting took place in the historic Pesthuis on the Naturalis campus.Other participants were:Donald Hobern, Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF)Peter Schalk and David Remsen, Catalogue of Life (CoL)Tom Orrell, National…
  • A New Snail Species Named in Honor of BHL!

    16 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    A new land snail species from Laos has been named in honor of the Biodiversity Heritage Library!Vargapupa biheli, named in honor of BHL. Image courtesy Dr. Barna Páll-Gergely.Vargapupa biheli, a medium-sized, slender turriform species with a well developed basal keel, was described in the article "Revision of the Genus Pseudopomatias and its Relatives (Gastropoda: Cyclophoroidea: Pupinidae" in Zootaxa: 3937(1), 2015, by Barna Páll-Gergely, Zoltán Fehér, András Hunyadi, and Takahiro Asami.The species is part of a newly-described genus, also articulated within this article, Vargapupa,…
  • BHL Program Director presents at the Catalogue of Life Mini-symposium in Oostende

    15 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    Peter Schalk, Catalogue of LifeBHL Program Director Martin R. Kalfatovic attended the Catalogue of Life Mini-symposium at the Flanders Marine Institute in Oostende, Belgium on 2 April 2015. Following on the Catalogue of Life (CoL) meetings, the purpose of the mini-symposium was to present uses of the Catalogue of Life and highlight collaborations.The opening session included an overview of the CoL from Chrstina Flann (CoL), a use case from the Botanical Garden, Meise (Henry Engeldow); and other presentations from Nicolas Bailly (Royal Museum for Central Africa & Fishbase), Danny Meirte…
  • The Biodiversity Heritage Library Adds The Field Museum as a New Member

    14 Apr 2015 | 5:30 am
    The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) welcomes The Field Museum as a new member. One of the original founding institutions of BHL in 2007, The Field Museum has participated in the Biodiversity Heritage Library as an Affiliate since 2012 and now represents the consortium’s 16th Member.  Descriptive catalogue of the lepidopterous insects contained in the Museum of the Honourable East-India Company. 1828-29. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37023686. Digitized for BHL by The Field Museum Library.Founded in 1893 as the Columbian Museum of Chicago, The Field Museum has been inspiring…
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    Under The Banyan

  • A thousand murders, a thousand stories to tell

    mike shanahan
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:58 am
    Bancha Noppawong is a very rare kind of man, simply because we know his name. He hit the headlines in October 2000, in Phuket, Thailand, when he drove a pick-up truck into a motorbike and knocked the two people on it into the road. The passenger, an 18-year old woman, sustained minor injuries to her […]
  • Announcing my book: Ladders to Heaven

    mike shanahan
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:50 am
    I have spent the past ten years writing a book about an extraordinary group of plants that have affected humanity in profound yet little-known ways. I am therefore delighted to announce today that Unbound will publish Ladders to Heaven: How fig trees shaped our history, fed our imaginations and can enrich our future. These trees […]
  • The empty forest where 100+ bird species are feared extinct

    mike shanahan
    23 Feb 2015 | 5:51 am
    Yet another forest is falling quiet with the silence of extinction
  • Dying to save the world

    mike shanahan
    10 Jul 2014 | 2:59 am
    Jeannette Kawas was an accountant whose concept of value was broader than any balance sheet. No number could capture for her the natural wealth she saw in the forests, rivers, beaches and mangrove swamps of Punta Sal, near her hometown of Tela in northern Honduras. In the 1980s, cattle ranchers, resort developers and loggers all […]
  • Frying eggs, flying foxes, dying wasps, crying shame

    mike shanahan
    24 Jun 2014 | 12:28 pm
    Crack an egg in a pan, turn up the heat and you can witness a kind of magic. In just seconds the viscous egg solidifies. Despite the rising heat, it’s the opposite of melting that occurs. I was a teenager when I heard a biology teacher explain this paradox: “The egg is full of proteins […]
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    Tales from Toriello

  • A few photographs from Aviles

    Ian Hicken
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:18 am
    For Luis' birthday we went to Aviles and the Peñas cape. Here are a few photographs:Peace, harmony and tranquility....
  • Dear Deer...

    Ian Hicken
    20 Apr 2015 | 11:54 pm
    Dear Deer,The other day whilst chatting to friends on Skype I spotted you out of the corner of my eye from the study window about to take a drink from our garden pond. It was lovely to see you in daylight as we normally only ever see you and other members of your herd on the trailcam at night and sometimes in the early morning as the mist is lifting.With your slender frame, bright dark eyes, and your growing antlers you looked very handsome and quite relaxed given the time of day (late afternoon). You took a small drink from the pond but then moved on to the birdbath which you seemed to…
  • They're only cats...

    Ian Hicken
    16 Apr 2015 | 10:30 am
    We've had a difficult few days with Wentworth (Black) and Gawber (Tabby) the cats. About 10 days ago Wentworth came home from his daily wanderings and was obviously sore on his tail and whimpered whenever we went near him. This is a sure sign he had been in a fight with another cat during his nightly adventures. This isn't the first time he has had such problems and we are very used to the process of bite, abscess formation, localised hair loss, abscess bursting, cleaning, scab formation and healing. This time it was a bit different.After three days the abscess grew and grew, hair…
  • Knowing your onions...

    Ian Hicken
    10 Apr 2015 | 9:10 am
    When something works, why meddle? Onions have always cropped well for us, granted, some years have been better than others but on the whole we usually grow enough onions to last us most of the year. We use a lot of onions in cooking, in chutneys and pickles and in salads. This year like previous years we have planted 150 early onions, 150 red and 150 white. Together with spring onions and leeks we will, mother nature willing, have enough at harvest time to last throughout the year.The ground is prepared by ensuring it has lots of compost and green manure dug in and left for a few weeks…
  • An update from Toriello

    Ian Hicken
    5 Apr 2015 | 5:36 am
    It has been full on here for the past seven days with lots of gardening, general maintenance, cycling challenges and visiting family.This recent spell of bright sunshine and warmer weather has brought everything on at a pace and we now have lots of blossom on the peach and greengage, the pear is just about to bloom and the orange tree is full of tiny white buds. The vegetable plot now has 100 potatoes planted, several rows of peas and mange tout, a new lavender hedge (for the bees, soap and hand cream making) and, the remainder of the compost has been added around the raspberry canes. The…
 
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Lomborg: a detailed citation analysis

    CJAB
    23 Apr 2015 | 10:37 pm
    There’s been quite a bit of palaver recently about the invasion of Lomborg’s ‘Consensus’ Centre to the University of Western Australia, including inter alia that there was no competitive process for the award of $4 million of taxpayer money from the Commonwealth Government, that Lomborg is a charlatan with a not-terribly-well-hidden anti-climate change agenda, and that he […]
  • Something rotten from Denmark

    CJAB
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:17 am
    It was just reported in the Guardian that infamous and discredited environmental charlatan, Bjørn Lomborg, who has recently been given the green light to set up shop in Australia after the University of Western Australia‘s Vice-Chancellor, Paul Johnson, extended him an olive branch, and the Abbott-oir government gave him $4 million to do so. Yes, […]
  • Missing the forest despite its trees

    CJAB
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:05 pm
    An exchange on Alert-Conservation.org over the intactness of boreal forests has just erupted. Bill Laurance asked me to weigh in as an independent appraiser of the debate, so I copy my thoughts below. You can read the original exchange between Jeff Wells and Nick Haddad (& colleagues) here. — Despite its immense size, there is […]
  • How things have (not) changed

    CJAB
    12 Apr 2015 | 3:32 pm
    The other night I had the pleasure of dining with the former Australian Democrats leader and senator, Dr John Coulter, at the home of Dr Paul Willis (Director of the Royal Institution of Australia). It was an enlightening evening. While we discussed many things, the 84 year-old Dr Coulter showed me a rather amazing advert that he […]
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXIX

    CJAB
    9 Apr 2015 | 12:54 am
    Second batch of six biodiversity cartoons for 2015 (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). — Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, cartoon, cartoons, climate change, Earth, energy, extinction, shark fin, sustainability
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    Conservation

  • Killer whales are stealing our fish to make extra babies

    Jason G. Goldman
    24 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Killer whales (Orcinus orca) didn’t get their name because they’re gentle herbivores. They are top marine predators, and as a species they feed on a variety of critters from fish to seabirds to marine mammals—including other whales. They are highly intelligent, long-lived animals, with complex social dynamics and traditions that vary from group to group.
  • How long do captive killer whales survive?

    Roberta Kwok
    23 Apr 2015 | 6:00 am
    Whales held captive outside the U.S. fare much worse than those in American facilities, a new study suggests. According to the report, killer whales typically live almost three times longer in captivity in the U.S. than in other countries. The study authors obtained U.S. data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Mammal Inventory
  • Why do village dogs eat endangered sea turtle eggs?

    Jason G. Goldman
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Feral and outdoor cats kill millions of birds each year, proving that when humans encroach on wildlife habitats, the risks to wildlife aren’t strictly human in origin. With humans come our domesticated pets. Cats get a bad rap, and perhaps they deserve it, but dogs aren’t entirely free from blame either. Domestic dogs are perhaps
  • Survey says: “shifting baselines” happen fast

    Sarah DeWeerdt
    21 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Over the last 25 years, outbreaks of spruce bark beetles have killed trees across more than a million acres of forests on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula, southwest of Anchorage. But people living in the area are losing a sense of just how bad the environmental damage caused by these insects has been, according to new research. The
  • To keep birds from striking aircraft, think like a bird

    Jason G. Goldman
    17 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    On the afternoon of January 15, 2009, US Airways Flight 1549 took off from New York’s La Guardia Airport bound for Charlotte, North Carolina. Several minutes after taking off, the aircraft’s engines met with a flock of Canada geese. In airplane parlance, it’s called a “bird strike,” and the Airbus A320 hit enough birds to
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