Biodiversity

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  • Swallowtails key to azalea pollination

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    29 Jul 2015 | 8:08 pm
    A Spicebush Swallowtail, Papilio troilus, pulls nectar from the blossom of a Pinxter-flower azalea, Rhododendron periclymenoides. A rival flutters in from the left, and it displaced the other butterfly a second later.I made this image back on May 15 in Shawnee State Forest, Scioto County, Ohio. The azaleas were in full bloom, and offered irresistible photo subjects. It didn't take long to see that swallowtail butterflies were drawn to the blossoms in large numbers, and soon those became the target of my lens.Pinxter-flower is a rare plant in Ohio, with an official designation of threatened.
  • Drought's lasting impact on forests

    CBD News Headlines
    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    In the virtual worlds of climate modeling, forests and other vegetation are assumed to bounce back quickly from extreme drought.
  • Not just any Wilmar suppliers caught violating no-deforestation policy

    Mongabay Enviromental News » Topics » Featured
    Philip Jacobson
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:33 pm
    [dropcap type="2"]Y[/dropcap]et other Wilmar suppliers are alleged to have cleared rainforest in violation of the palm oil giant’s sustainability policy, but this time the allegations hit closer to home. A new report by Greenomics-Indonesia, an NGO, finds clearing of forested peatlands on two concessions controlled by the Ganda Group, whose owner, Ganda Sitorus, is the younger brother of Wilmar co-founder Martua Sitorus. The allegations are confirmed by satellite imagery. One of the concessions is held by a Ganda subsidiary called Patiware, the largest listed supplier of Wilmar Indonesia,…
  • Interns for documentary team filming Singapore’s wildlife (1 – 3 months)

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:57 pm
    Claire Clements from Beach House Pictures who made Wild City is looking for a couple of interns for their latest wildlife documentary filmed here in Singapore about Singapore’s wildlife. She says, Beach House Pictures is offering a paid internship (1 – 3 months) working on our latest wildlife documentaries! This is a great opportunity for young nature lovers to get involved, have input and get some great experience in a very niche industry. Please note if you are studying and cannot commit to full time but would like to be involved we could potentially hire you as a part term…
  • Taming the Wild Social Media Animals: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger… Oh My!

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    30 Jul 2015 | 5:30 am
    As the daughter of a children’s librarian and library branch manager, I grew up in public libraries and have become passionate about the important role a library plays within a community. This has led me down the path of becoming a librarian myself. Originally from California, I’m now living on the east coast and attending graduate school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pursuing my passion for this institution. This coming year is my last year of school for a dual Master degree program in Library Science and Public Administration. Normally, I work as a Graduate Research…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • Swallowtails key to azalea pollination

    29 Jul 2015 | 8:08 pm
    A Spicebush Swallowtail, Papilio troilus, pulls nectar from the blossom of a Pinxter-flower azalea, Rhododendron periclymenoides. A rival flutters in from the left, and it displaced the other butterfly a second later.I made this image back on May 15 in Shawnee State Forest, Scioto County, Ohio. The azaleas were in full bloom, and offered irresistible photo subjects. It didn't take long to see that swallowtail butterflies were drawn to the blossoms in large numbers, and soon those became the target of my lens.Pinxter-flower is a rare plant in Ohio, with an official designation of threatened.
  • Midwest Native Plant Conference 2015

    27 Jul 2015 | 8:09 pm
    The crowd at last weekend's Midwest Native Plant Conference gathers for Friday night's keynote, Don Leopold. This was the 7th year for the conference; the 6th at Bergamo Center on the grounds of Mount St. John in Dayton, Ohio. It sells out every year, and this year it took only about 30 days after registration opened to fill all 175 slots.The conference is a boatload of work, and the planning committee deserves kudos. They are: Karen Arnett, Yvonne Cecil, Yvonne Dunphe, Judy Ganance, Ann Geise, Teri Gilligan, Scott Hogsten, Ned Keller, Randy Lakes, Diana Malas, Jim…
  • PSA: Hickory Tussock Moth caterpillar

    21 Jul 2015 | 9:08 pm
    I interrupt the irregularly unscheduled programming of this blog to offer up a Public Service Announcement about a caterpillar that has been generating lots of questions and comments of late.The fuzzy bag of goo in question is, as shown above, the caterpillar of the Hickory Tussock Moth (HTM), Lophocampa caryae. I've received more than a few queries about these hirsute white cats, and so have many others. Perhaps you've seen one or many yourself this summer.While the HTM caterpillars are often seen alone and on the march, they are sometimes found twisting in the breeze, suspended by…
  • Brutal thunderstorm, and hummingbird photobomb

    19 Jul 2015 | 8:22 pm
    A palette of color, courtesy of some Grade A prairie plants, stretches as far as the eye can see at Prairie Oaks Metro Park in Madison County, Ohio. Franklin County Metro Parks has long been on a mission to restore big chunks of the former Darby Plains prairie, and their successes are there for all to see. We're fortunate indeed to have such a fine parks system in Central Ohio; a park system that thinks as much of native flora and fauna and natural ecosystems as it does ball fields, playgrounds, etc.I was on a photographic mission in the prairies and fens west of Columbus today, and…
  • A truly Regal Fritillary

    18 Jul 2015 | 9:24 pm
    Ominous skies boil over the prairies of western Indiana. It didn't take a meteorologist to predict an imminent monsoon, and sure enough, the skies soon let loose.I finally made a long overdue trip to Kankakee Sands in Newton County, Indiana, to see one of the Midwest's most notable prairie restoration projects. This site is only about an hour south of Chicago, and my friend and Chicagoan Joyce Pontius bopped down to join me, and we were to meet up with Mike Homoya and Roger Hedge of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Mike and Roger wisely decided to cancel, as they had a long drive…
 
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    CBD News Headlines

  • Drought's lasting impact on forests

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    In the virtual worlds of climate modeling, forests and other vegetation are assumed to bounce back quickly from extreme drought.
  • New study exposes negative effects of climate change on Antarctic fish

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Scientists at University of California Davis and San Francisco State University have discovered that the combination of elevated levels of carbon dioxide and an increase in ocean water temperature has a significant impact on survival and development of the Antarctic dragonfish (Gymnodraco acuticeps). The research article was published in the journal Conservation Physiology.
  • Aquariums 'deliver significant health benefits'

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    People who spend time in aquariums could improve their physical and mental wellbeing, a study has suggested.
  • No such thing as a free lunch, we should invest in the land

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    We all know that if you are spending more than you earn, there is a tipping point from which you can never recover. It is the point of bankruptcy. The same is true of productive natural resources like land.
  • Scientists call for U.S. ban on salamander imports

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:00 pm
    BERKELEY, Calif., July 30 (UPI) -- Scientists in California have called on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to immediately halt salamander imports until there's a concrete plan to detect and isolate the fungus that's decimated amphibians in Europe.
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    Mongabay Enviromental News » Topics » Featured

  • Not just any Wilmar suppliers caught violating no-deforestation policy

    Philip Jacobson
    30 Jul 2015 | 3:33 pm
    [dropcap type="2"]Y[/dropcap]et other Wilmar suppliers are alleged to have cleared rainforest in violation of the palm oil giant’s sustainability policy, but this time the allegations hit closer to home. A new report by Greenomics-Indonesia, an NGO, finds clearing of forested peatlands on two concessions controlled by the Ganda Group, whose owner, Ganda Sitorus, is the younger brother of Wilmar co-founder Martua Sitorus. The allegations are confirmed by satellite imagery. One of the concessions is held by a Ganda subsidiary called Patiware, the largest listed supplier of Wilmar Indonesia,…
  • Cleaning up cacao: making the chocolate business more sustainable

    Rhett Butler
    26 Jul 2015 | 8:17 am
    While most people love chocolate, few are aware of the problems associated with the production of its main ingredient, cacao. The cacao business has traditionally been an ugly one, associated with child labor, debt bondage, water pollution, and deforestation. That has begun to change in recent years with the emergence of various certification standards and sourcing safeguards by some of the biggest consumer products companies, yet in many cases still too few benefits reach many communities. Tom Neuhaus is working to change that in several villages in the West African countries of Cameroon,…
  • Amazon Headwaters Under Siege: 19 dams slated for Napo watershed

    Tiffany Roufs
    15 Jul 2015 | 8:10 am
    The Napo Watershed forms one of the last free-flowing river corridors of the Amazon Basin, and is an important tourism destination where visitors can immerse themselves in stunning rainforest scenery and have the adventure of their dreams. Photo credit: Nunatak Design.   The Napo River watershed is immense. Fed by snow from the glaciated volcanic peaks of the Andes Mountains, and by rainwater falling on steamy lowland Ecuadorian rainforests, this vast stretch of Amazonia supports diverse terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, with significant unstudied flora and fauna. At present, the main…
  • Damming Dissent: Community leaders behind bars in Guatemala after opposing hydro projects

    Rebecca Kessler
    4 Dec 0001 | 4:00 pm
    Mayan women protest hydroelectric dam projects in Santa Cruz Barillas in western Guatemala on March 16, 2014. Local opposition to the construction of dams and other natural resource projects in the area has resulted in a government crackdown on activists. Photo credit: Luis Miranda Brugos / Alba Sud Fotografia. Thursdays are one of two visiting days at the men's pre-trial detention center in the city of Huehuetenango. Women from around the department (also called Huehuetenango) in western Guatemala begin lining up outside early in the morning, and at nine, they filter in to see their…
  • Jhuliño’s legacy: Life and death on the Marañon River (photo essay)

    Tiffany Roufs
    4 Dec 0001 | 4:00 pm
    This is Alvaro Huaman, in the uniform of the ronda, with Jhuliño and his baby brother. Jhuliño's real name was Egler, but from a young age, he had been obsessed with Brazilian soccer, and so everyone had begun calling him after his favorite player. Before we went over big rapids, I would tease Jhuliño, asking him if he was scared. He'd laugh and say, "Ni a la muerte," ('Not even of death') or "Estoy en mi casa, waiki, como tendria miedo," ('I'm in my house, brother, how could I be scared?'). Photo Credit: Danielle Villasana. If all goes according to plan, the village of Tupen Grande will…
 
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Interns for documentary team filming Singapore’s wildlife (1 – 3 months)

    otterman
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:57 pm
    Claire Clements from Beach House Pictures who made Wild City is looking for a couple of interns for their latest wildlife documentary filmed here in Singapore about Singapore’s wildlife. She says, Beach House Pictures is offering a paid internship (1 – 3 months) working on our latest wildlife documentaries! This is a great opportunity for young nature lovers to get involved, have input and get some great experience in a very niche industry. Please note if you are studying and cannot commit to full time but would like to be involved we could potentially hire you as a part term…
  • Wed 05 Aug 2015: 4.15pm @ DBS CF2 – Greg Rouse on “Queens of Decay, Osedax bone worms and whalefalls”

    otterman
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:28 pm
    The biology, life history and phylogeny of Osedax, deep-sea siboglinid polychaetes (boneworms, bone-eating or zombie worms) which bore into bones of whale carcasses to feed on lipids. Click for pdf Filed under: talks
  • Wed 05 Aug 2015: 2.00pm @ NUS DBS CR2 – Helen Nash on the “Ecology, genetics and conservation of pangolins”

    otterman
    23 Jul 2015 | 8:12 pm
    Qualifying Examination Department of Biological Sciences National University of Singapore “Ecology, genetics and conservation of pangolins” Helen Nash Graduate Student, NUS Biological Sciences Wed 05 Aug 2015: 2.00pm @ Conference Room-II (S1 Level 3, mezzanine) Supervisor: Assoc Prof Evans, Theodore Alfred Abstract: Mammal species in East and SE Asia are at the highest risk of extinction for mammals anywhere in the world. Of this select group, the ant and termite eating scaly pangolins (Family Pholidota) are particularly threatened. Pangolin populations are in severe decline in…
  • Neo Mei Lin, marine biologist, featured on Women’s Weekly

    otterman
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:50 pm
    Neo Mei Lin says, “I am honoured to be nominated by The Singapore Women’s Weekly for this award, and had a chance to see what’s like behind the scenes of fashion, makeup and glam. I couldn’t ask for more as I already feel like a winner! I hope my interview reaches out to a different audience, and for them to see what’s like to be a marine biologist and environmentalist.” Courtesy of The Singapore Women’s Weekly, August 2015. In a similar vein, see: “Marcus Chua (Systematics and Ecology Lab) in Her World magazine.” Aug 2012 link “Women…
  • Today, Thu 23 Jul 2015: 4.00pm @ NUS DBS Conference Room 1 – ­Lucie Bland on “Assessing Global Risks to Biodiversity”

    otterman
    22 Jul 2015 | 8:22 pm
    Filed under: seminar
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • Taming the Wild Social Media Animals: Facebook, Twitter, Blogger… Oh My!

    30 Jul 2015 | 5:30 am
    As the daughter of a children’s librarian and library branch manager, I grew up in public libraries and have become passionate about the important role a library plays within a community. This has led me down the path of becoming a librarian myself. Originally from California, I’m now living on the east coast and attending graduate school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pursuing my passion for this institution. This coming year is my last year of school for a dual Master degree program in Library Science and Public Administration. Normally, I work as a Graduate Research…
  • BHL Summer Newsletter and Quarterly Report Now Available!

    29 Jul 2015 | 7:54 am
    How does the Biodiversity Heritage Library support scientific initiatives around the world?BHL's latest quarterly report highlights many ways that our open access biodiversity resources are supporting the work of scientists and researchers across the globe, including in the fields of taxonomy, agricultural science, ocean sciences, and more.Plus, you can explore all of the great things that BHL has been up to the past few months.Check out our Summer 2015 Quarterly Report today.You can also see some of our latest developments in our Summer 2015 newsletter. Check out our Summer 2015…
  • NYBG's Flora Illustrata Wins Two Prestigious Awards

    28 Jul 2015 | 5:30 am
    Flora Illustrata: Great works from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library of The New York Botanical Garden, edited by Susan M. Fraser and Vanessa Bezemer Sellers and published by The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG) - a founding BHL Member - and Yale University Press, has been honored with two prestigious awards: the 2015 American Horticultural Society Book Award and the CBHL 2015 Annual Literature Award.On 4 June, 2015, the American Horticultural Society named Flora Illustrata as one of its 2015 AHS Book Award Winners during the Great American Gardeners Awards Ceremony and Banquet in…
  • The Conchologists: Searching for Seashells in 19th Century America

    23 Jul 2015 | 5:30 am
    This post was originally published on the Inside Adams blog from the Library of Congress. See the original post here.Post by Jennifer HarbsterResearch and Reference Specialist | Library of CongressIn the 19th century naturalists and enlightened amateurs in the U.S. cultivated an understanding of the natural world of this new country by documenting new and known varieties of plant and animal species. One of these scientific pursuits was conchology- the study and collection of marine, freshwater and terrestrial shells. The story of American conchology has the makings of a great screenplay –…
  • Announcing Altmetric and MyTweeps on BHL!

    20 Jul 2015 | 7:30 am
    Have you ever wanted to learn more about the books in BHL? Or maybe find out what people are saying on social media about our collections? Or perhaps you'd like to connect with other BHL-enthusiasts?We're excited to announce that today, as part of our Mining Biodiversity project, we've launched two new features on BHL that will allow you to do all of the above! These features are Altmetric and MyTweeps.AltmetricAltmetric is a UK-based company that offers tools to help track online mentions of a library, publisher, or other entities’ content. Sites such as Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia,…
 
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Ribadesella 21st Jazz Festival

    Ian Hicken
    26 Jul 2015 | 6:07 am
    This weekend has seen the arrival in town of the 21st Ribadesella Jazz Festival, an event not to be missed if you like free outdoor concerts with a great atmosphere and great music. Each year if we are here, we usually pop along to the concerts which span three consecutive nights. The concerts take place in one of the main squares in town and are well attended by all age groups. They start at 11pm through to 12.30am or there abouts depending on how many encores they are called back for.Friday night saw the blues band Red House take to the stage. The crowd was really got into the mood of the…
  • Portraits in Mosaic

    Ian Hicken
    16 Jul 2015 | 5:01 am
    Luis has just returned to Asturias from a two week mosaic course in Belgium and from visiting fellow mosaicists in both Belgium and Holland. Needless to say he has had a brilliant and very productive time. The piece he chose to work on in Belgium under the tutelage of Mireille Swinnen at http://www.mozaiekstudio.be/ was based on an ageing Pierrot clown - a portrait in tessarae using a direct method in a painterly style. I was really pleased with his choice as for those of you who don't know I was once a keyboard player for a band called My Pierrot Dolls in the early 1980s (who…
  • In the heat of the midday sun at La Pasera

    Ian Hicken
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:45 am
    Continuing our time specific theme for Summer it struck me the other day how life changes with the weather. Here at  La Pasera it has been very warm and muggy for the past few days with little relief from the persistent heat and overwhelming warm humid air. Unlike the rest of Spain and Europe it seems, where constant sunshine has been the order of the day, we have had short bouts of strong sunshine followed by low overcast skies which have felt equally oppressive. Not only has it had an effect on us, it has changed the entire dynamics of life in the garden.Wentworth and Gawber are to be…
  • In the still of the night at La Pasera

    Ian Hicken
    27 Jun 2015 | 8:01 am
    In the still of the night when we are asleep, the garden continues to host an array of wildlife we rarely see or think about... What happens in your garden at night?As dusk falls, the birds call out the end of the day before roosting in bushes, trees and crevices. The bats take flight and feast on the abundant mist of midges, flies and moths and the owls fly low from perch to perch in search of mice, voles and frogs. The frogs begin their chatter and the toads sing out loud announcing their presence to passing mates. Meanwhile the snails and slugs exit their daytime refuge and take advantage…
  • The first day of Summer

    Ian Hicken
    21 Jun 2015 | 8:54 am
    It is a bright sunny day with blue skies punctuated by white and pale grey Columbus clouds. It is warm bordering on hot in the sun but with plenty of shaded places to keep cool, it is a lovely first day of Summer.The first peaches were harvested today and although the tree doesn't produce much fruit, what it does produce is sweet, very peachy and juicy if left to ripen naturally. One or two have already been pecked at by the birds and then plundered by the ants but as today was getting breezy I decided to harvest the first of the undamaged crop before they fell in the gathering winds.The…
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Écologie en France

    CJAB
    26 Jul 2015 | 9:25 pm
    This is just a quick post to update ConservationBytes.com followers about a few things I’ll be up to over the next 5 months. While I can guarantee that the posts will be more or less as frequent, some of the subject material might shift slightly given my new geographic focus. I’m most fortunate to have […]
  • Ice Age? No. Abrupt warmings and hunting together polished off Holarctic megafauna

    CJAB
    23 Jul 2015 | 11:00 am
    Did ice ages cause the Pleistocene megafauna to go extinct? Contrary to popular opinion, no, they didn’t. But climate change did have something to do with them, only it was global warming events instead. Just out today in Science, our long-time-coming (9 years in total if you count the time from the original idea to today) […]
  • Can we save biodiversity? Not as long as ‘democracy’ is for sale

    CJAB
    15 Jul 2015 | 10:08 am
    Like you, I’m tired of the constant battle with ill-informed politicians who claim all sorts of nonsense reasons for the bad environmental decisions they make in the name of so-called ‘democracy’. The flesh of my right hand is sore from the constant fist-bashing of tables as I let loose yet another diatribe concerning why our politicians […]
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXXI

    CJAB
    8 Jul 2015 | 11:20 am
    Fourth batch of six biodiversity cartoons for 2015, because I’m travelling and haven’t had a lot of time for a more detailed post (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). — Filed under: Australia, Darwin, deforestation, development, environmental policy Tagged: biodiversity, biodiversity cartoons, cartoon, cartoons, corridors, logging, wildlife
  • Grim tale of global shark declines

    CJAB
    25 Jun 2015 | 1:26 am
    How do you prevent declines of species you cannot even see? This is (and has always been) the dilemma for fisheries because, well, humans don’t live underwater. Even when we strap on a metal tank full of air and a pair of fins, we’re still more or less like wounded astronauts peering through a narrow window […]
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    Conservation

  • Bald Eagles Are Back, But What’s on Their Menu?

    Jason G. Goldman
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    Several years ago some folks mused about the possibility of bringing extinct species back into existence, a process that’s been dubbed “de-extinction.” It’s an intriguing idea, but one important question that’s been asked as people have wrestled wit the implications of de-extinction is just what it would mean to be an individual of a de-extincted
  • Which ocean animals will escape warming waters?

    Roberta Kwok
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:00 am
    The rich get richer, and the poor get poorer, the saying goes — and it looks like the same may hold true for marine species’ responses to climate change. Ocean animals that already enjoy large home ranges are claiming new territory faster than those that have historically stuck to a smaller area. “[N]arrow-range species may
  • Keeping Lake Tahoe Blue Doesn’t Mean Keeping It Clear

    Jason G. Goldman
    29 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    The Amazon River and its tributaries, long watery snakes wind their way through the Amazon rainforest, are a dull, murky, muddy brown. Other waterways show up as green, primarily thanks to photosynthesizing algae. But perhaps the most prized waterways are colored a deep, rich, vibrant blue. Lake Tahoe, the second deepest lake in the US
  • Climate change stunts opportunities for next generation — of us

    Sarah DeWeerdt
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    Authorities including the World Health Organization and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have long posited that climate change will leave more children around the world vulnerable to hunger. That’s a reminder that our own species is just another kind of animal, and despite all our tools and technologies we, too, remain at the mercy of the
  • Will rising seas drown sea turtle eggs?

    Jason G. Goldman
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    Raine Island is really nothing more than a sandy speck located on the fringes of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef. Barely a third of a square kilometer in surface area and some 630 kilometers from the nearest major city, Cairns, the island is home to the world’s largest green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) rookery. For at
 
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