Biodiversity

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  • Beautiful mushrooms, ill consequences

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    25 Oct 2014 | 12:54 pm
    On my recent foray through Kent Bog, written about HERE, I couldn't help to notice a multitude of colorful mushrooms. Nor could I resist going prostrate on the wet boardwalk to make images. I am not much of a mushroom expert, but find them irresistible photography subjects. I've got a large pile of mystery mushroom photos awaiting identification.I do think I know the name of this blood-orange beauty. It is Russula emetica, and that scientific epithetic should tell you all you need to know about its edibility. Emetic comes from the Greek word emetikos, which means vomiting. My identification…
  • The secret life of the sea trout

    CBD News Headlines
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Sea trout, also known as brown trout, live complicated lives. Like salmon, they begin their lives in a river, hatched from eggs that were laid in small nests, called redds.
  • Photos: slumbering lions win top photo prize

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Jeremy Hance
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:32 am
    The king of beasts took this year's top prize in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, which is co-owned by the Natural History Museum (London) and the BBC. The photo, of female lions and their cubs resting on a rock face in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, was taken by Michael 'Nick' Nichols, a photographer with National Geographic.
  • Emails to Life Science undergraduates: field trips and research conversation opportunities

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Sent to AY2014/15 Sem 1 students reading LSM1103, LSM2251 & LSM3261. Field assistants for honours studentsSign up at: http://tinyurl.com/hons-fieldwork Our undergraduate research students are engaged in a variety of field observations following monkeys in the forest, studying freshwater streams, mapping the distribution of fruit trees important to civets, exploring trash in mangroves and a variety other work. This is an important period in their lives when they grapple with field work very seriously, examine the literature, evaluate their methods and collect data with specific objectives.
  • The Quest for the Sea Serpent: An Oarfish or Something More?

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    "Soe Orm." Magnus, Olaus. Historia de Gentibus Septentionalibus. 1555. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41862944.In the 16th century, the ocean was a terrifying place. Creatures of unimaginable size and ferocity stalked the waters. One such beast was Soe Orm.“A very large sea serpent of a length upwards of 200 feet and 20 feet in diameter which lives in rocks and in holes near the shore of Bergen; it comes out of its cavern only on summer nights and in fine weather to destroy calves, lambs, or hogs, or goes into the sea to eat cuttles, lobster, and all kinds of sea crabs. It has a growth…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • Beautiful mushrooms, ill consequences

    25 Oct 2014 | 12:54 pm
    On my recent foray through Kent Bog, written about HERE, I couldn't help to notice a multitude of colorful mushrooms. Nor could I resist going prostrate on the wet boardwalk to make images. I am not much of a mushroom expert, but find them irresistible photography subjects. I've got a large pile of mystery mushroom photos awaiting identification.I do think I know the name of this blood-orange beauty. It is Russula emetica, and that scientific epithetic should tell you all you need to know about its edibility. Emetic comes from the Greek word emetikos, which means vomiting. My identification…
  • A pictorial stroll through Kent Bog

    23 Oct 2014 | 6:34 pm
    A trip to Akron last Saturday took me near one of Ohio's most iconic natural areas, so I left early to spend some time in Kent Bog. Or, as it is formally known, the Tom S. Cooperrider Kent Bog State Nature Preserve. Tom deserves the honor. The Kent State University botanist has done lots of great things, and served as a mentor for many, yours truly included.Kent Bog is a local (and state) treasure, and is heavily used by the people of Kent and surrounding areas.That such a place would survive in a rather heavily developed area is a bit of a miracle. I believe local support for the bog's well…
  • The Buck Moths ride again

    21 Oct 2014 | 7:59 pm
    Last weekend was a whirlwind tour of the state. I was in northeast Ohio on Saturday to give a talk for Summit County Metro Parks (thanks for having me, Meghan!). Since that program wasn't until 7 pm, I headed up early to visit some iconic natural areas and make some images.In the photo above, we're looking off the massive bluffs of Hach-Otis State Nature Preserve. Fall color was nearing peak. I only regret that it was a rainy, overcast day. A bright blue sky day would have made the leaf color sizzle, but one takes what one gets.The following day, it was up early and off to southern Ohio at…
  • Fringed Gentians

    19 Oct 2014 | 7:49 pm
      As most plants decline, fringed gentians put on a showTHE COLUMBUS DISPATCHOctober 19, 2014NATUREJim McCormacThou blossom bright with autumn dew, And colored with the heaven’s own blue, That openest when the quiet light Succeeds the keen and frosty night.  — excerpted from To the Fringed Gentian by William Cullen BryantFall’s frosty days are here, and colder weather and shorter days have muted autumn’s spectacular wildflowers.Some flowers persist in a losing battle with Old Man Winter. The riotous bouquet of asters, colored in blue, white and purple, struggle mightily to…
  • Mergansers make a comeback in the Mountain State

    15 Oct 2014 | 6:39 pm
    A rocky mountain stream is punctuated by a quiet pool near Summersville, West Virginia. My friend Rachel Davis, who lives not far from here, showed me this little park back in late September. The place was full of biodiversity. Not long after exiting the car we saw a cool bird, and it was time to flip from the landscape lens to something with a bit more pulling power.A hen Common Merganser! To birders used to seeing this species in migration and winter, when they frequent large lakes and rivers, seeing one on a small creek might seem strange. But Common Mergansers nest along streams, and I…
 
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Photos: slumbering lions win top photo prize

    Jeremy Hance
    27 Oct 2014 | 8:32 am
    The king of beasts took this year's top prize in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, which is co-owned by the Natural History Museum (London) and the BBC. The photo, of female lions and their cubs resting on a rock face in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, was taken by Michael 'Nick' Nichols, a photographer with National Geographic.
  • Next big idea in forest conservation? Recognize the value of novel forests

    Jeremy Hance
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:45 am
    Think first before you eradicate non-native species says Dr. Ariel E. Lugo, the current director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry within the USDA Forest Service, based in Puerto Rico. Lugo, an accomplished ecologist, supports the idea that both native and non-native plants have important roles to play in conservation efforts.
  • Saving the survivor: China scrambles to keep the finless porpoise from extinction

    Tiffany Roufs
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:35 am
    On the morning of July 14, 2002 Qi Qi ate breakfast as he always did. As the world’s only captive baiji – or Yangtze river dolphin – Qi Qi was something of a celebrity in China and his caretakers kept a close eye on his health. That care may explain why, after being injured by fishermen, he lived an impressive 22 years in the Freshwater Dolphin Research Center in Wuhan, China.
  • Top scientists raise concerns over commercial logging on Woodlark Island

    Jeremy Hance
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:05 am
    A number of the world's top conservation scientists have raised concerns about plans for commercial logging on Woodlark Island, a hugely biodiverse rainforest island off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The scientists, with the Alliance of Leading Environmental Scientists and Thinkers (ALERT), warn that commercial logging on the island could imperil the island's stunning local species and its indigenous people.
  • Indonesia developing mega coal mine five times larger than Singapore

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:00 am
    Global miner BHP Billiton and Indonesian partner PT Adaro are developing what could become the single largest mine in Indonesia in terms of land area, with BHP owning 75 percent. The IndoMet mine complex in Central and East Kalimantan provinces on Borneo comprises seven coal concessions, which cover 350,000 hectares, or about five times the size of Singapore.
 
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Emails to Life Science undergraduates: field trips and research conversation opportunities

    otterman
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Sent to AY2014/15 Sem 1 students reading LSM1103, LSM2251 & LSM3261. Field assistants for honours studentsSign up at: http://tinyurl.com/hons-fieldwork Our undergraduate research students are engaged in a variety of field observations following monkeys in the forest, studying freshwater streams, mapping the distribution of fruit trees important to civets, exploring trash in mangroves and a variety other work. This is an important period in their lives when they grapple with field work very seriously, examine the literature, evaluate their methods and collect data with specific objectives.
  • Job: Research Assistant (National Carbon Stock Assessment; deadline 31 Oct 2014)

    otterman
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:01 am
    Research Assistant (Natural Sciences and Science Education) The National Institute of Education invites suitable applications for the position of Research Assistant on a 6-month contract at the Natural Sciences and Science Education (NSSE). Project Title: ANRICA – Carbon Stock Assessment Project Introduction: This is a 5-year national carbon accounting project in collaboration with the National Parks Board (NParks) with the aim of developing a national system to monitor carbon emissions/reductions resulting from loss/gain of vegetation due to changes in the land use over time. All greenery…
  • Jobs: 1) Research Fellow; 2) Research Assistant in Urban Ecology (Closing Date: 18 Oct 2014)

    otterman
    8 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    (1) Research Fellow in Urban Ecology Job Description The urban greenery and ecology group in the Department of Architecture at the School of Design and Environment invites application for a Research Fellow for a research project on biophilic design of townships in Singapore. The position is open for a 3-year appointment commencing in December 2014. The research domain covers the multiple disciplines of landscape architecture, urban planning and design and human-nature relationships using urban ecology as the overarching framework. Additional project information can be found here (Project 3).
  • JC Mendoza is “Crazy about crabs” (article in Nat Geo Extreme Explorer)

    otterman
    1 Oct 2014 | 6:36 pm
    Click to read JC Mendoza’s Nat Geo Extreme Explorer article in which he tells some stories from his many encounters during expeditions and examinations of crustacea; well done JC! Filed under: article
  • Fri 03 Oct 2014: 2.00pm @ DBS Conf Rm 2: Sinlan Poo on “Reproductive Ecology and Parental Care of a Southeast Asian Treefrog”

    weiting
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:46 pm
    PhD Defense Seminar cum Oral Examination “Reproductive Ecology and Parental Care of a Southeast Asian Treefrog” Sinlan Poo Graduate Student, Dept. of Biological Sciences, NUS Supervisor: Asst. Prof David Bickford Fri 03 Oct 2014: 2.00pm DBS Conference Room II (S1 Level 3, Mezzaine) All are welcome Abstract –  “Parental care is a reproductive strategy that increases fitness of parents by having more surviving offspring. The evolution of parental care is closely linked to sexual selection, mating systems, and other life-history characteristics of an organism. However, parental care can…
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • The Quest for the Sea Serpent: An Oarfish or Something More?

    29 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    "Soe Orm." Magnus, Olaus. Historia de Gentibus Septentionalibus. 1555. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/41862944.In the 16th century, the ocean was a terrifying place. Creatures of unimaginable size and ferocity stalked the waters. One such beast was Soe Orm.“A very large sea serpent of a length upwards of 200 feet and 20 feet in diameter which lives in rocks and in holes near the shore of Bergen; it comes out of its cavern only on summer nights and in fine weather to destroy calves, lambs, or hogs, or goes into the sea to eat cuttles, lobster, and all kinds of sea crabs. It has a growth…
  • A Whale of a Tale...The Leviathan

    28 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    The Devil Whale In the 6th century AD, St. Brendan, an Irish cleric, and eighteen other monks, sailed out from Ireland to cross the ocean. Amidst their journey, they came upon a black, treeless island and decided to make camp for the night. Several monks set up a cooking station and lit a fire. And then the island began to move. Terrified, the monks fled back to their boat, leaving the food and fire behind. St. Brandon urged them not to be afraid; it was simply the great fish Jasconius, “which laboreth night and day to put his tail in his mouth, but for greatness he may not.”St.
  • Monsters Are Real…

    27 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    They just look a little different in the light of day. “HIC SUNT DRACONES.”This phrase translates from the Latin as “here are dragons.” It is etched on the eastern coast of Asia on one of the oldest terrestrial globe maps, the Lenox Globe, dating to 1510.Though the phrase itself is found on only one other historical artifact, a 1504 globe crafted on an ostrich egg, the depiction of monsters and mythological beasts are common on early maps. They crop up most commonly in the unexplored reaches of the oceans, warning would-be explorers of the perils of these unknown…
  • BHL Adds the National Library Board, Singapore as a New Member

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    Oriental Scops Owl, a species found in South Asia, including Singapore. A History of the Birds of Ceylon. v. 1. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37019175BHL is pleased to welcome the National Library Board, Singapore as a new member in BHL Central and simultaneously as BHL-Singapore, the newest node in Global BHL. The 16th member of the BHL Central consortium, BHL Singapore will help identify and digitize historical science literature from its collections and add these to the BHL’s online holdings, where all materials may be accessed free by the public.“The Biodiversity Heritage…
  • National Agricultural Library (NAL) Joins BHL!

    22 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    We are pleased to announce that the USDA National Agricultural Library (NAL) has joined the Biodiversity Heritage Library as a BHL Affiliate. BHL has already ingested over 845,000 pages of NAL-digitized content made openly available within the Internet Archive. This formal partnership will allow us to strengthen our collection of agricultural-related content through direct collaboration with NAL.The National Agricultural Library (NAL) comprises one of the largest collections of materials devoted to agriculture in the world. Collection concentrations include the fields of agriculture,…
 
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Mosaicos La Pasera, an update.

    Ian Hicken
    25 Oct 2014 | 12:27 am
    As a mosaicist and whilst living at La Pasera, I have designed and created numerous decorative pebble mosaics that now adorn paths and a small terrace. My passion for this mosaic genre stems from my love for pebbles and a holiday we once took in the Greek Island of Rhodes where we saw many decorative mosaics been used as pavement. After returning home, Ian got me as a present, a book by Maggy Howarth titled "the art of pebble mosaic". Since then, I have completed a good number of mosaics that decorate our garden and have had several as commissions.For my latest pebble mosaic of a flower pot…
  • Beans - from plant to plate

    Ian Hicken
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:13 pm
    Beans are big here in Asturias, not in a huge way but in usage in all kinds of cookery. One of the traditional dishes is Fabada which is white beans with chorizo, black pudding and fat. Really not our cup of tea but very popular amongst the tourists and served in most restaurants. Being vegetarian, beans provide us with much needed protein and a stock that can be used all year round.We sow our own bean seeds (dried from the previous year) in April indoors. These are then transplanted into soil when they germinate and put outside to grow on. We are fortunate in so much that we do not have…
  • Autumn foraging: Chestnuts and Walnuts

    Ian Hicken
    12 Oct 2014 | 6:01 am
    We may have mentioned this before but walnuts and chestnuts are abundant around here. There are many fully grown trees on country lanes, on field boundaries and in cultivated plots. This year is a particularly good year for foraging as the trees are heavy with fruit.The good news for amateur foragers like us is that very few people collect these crops, preferring instead to purchase from commercial sellers on the markets: convenience I suppose. When out walking or cycling at this time of year we will take a small bag with us and collect what we find along the way. It is surprising how quickly…
  • If you go down to the beach today....

    Ian Hicken
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:32 am
    You're in for a big surprise... Well at least on the beach at Cuevas del Mar here in Asturias. This beach is about 5km from La Pasera and we occasionally walk to it from our house along the cliffs and through villages and country lanes. The area is peppered with caves (hence the name), many of which are shouting out to be explored.The beach hit the local news this year as the severe spring storms devastated the sand, taking most of it out to sea and leaving very little apart from pebbles. This small beach is popular during summer as it's a quiet bay is ideal and safe for swimming. The locals…
  • Dragonflies and damselflies in the garden

    Ian Hicken
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:34 am
    Throughout summer and early autumn here at La Pasera we are witness to the finely tuned aerobatic skills of dragonflies and damselflies are they navigate the garden, ponds and plants. Each year they lay their newly fertilised eggs on pond plants or directly into the water where they develop into nymphs.Most damselflies complete their life cycle in one year: egg, nymph, damselfly where as dragonflies can take up to 5 years depending on the climate, conditions and species. There are over 100 species in Europe and over 5000 worldwide.As they emerge from the water in their nymph stage, they cling…
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Human population size: speeding cars can’t stop quickly

    CJAB
    27 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Here at ConservationBytes.com, I write about pretty much anything that has anything remotely to do with biodiversity’s prospects. Whether it is something to do with ancient processes, community dynamics or the wider effects of human endeavour, anything is fair game. It’s a little strange then that despite cutting my teeth in population biology, I have […]
  • It’s not all about cats

    CJAB
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:37 pm
    If you follow any of the environment news in Australia, you will most certainly have seen a lot about feral cats in the last few weeks. I’ve come across dozens of articles in the last week alone talking about the horrendous toll feral cats have had on Australian wildlife since European arrival. In principle, this […]
  • Australia should have a more vibrant ecological culture

    CJAB
    12 Oct 2014 | 9:58 pm
    I’ve always had the gut feeling that Australia punched above its weight when it comes to ecology and conservation. For years I’ve been confidently bragging to whomever might listen (mostly at conference pub sessions) that Australians have a vibrant academic and professional community of ecologists who are internationally renowned and respected. However, my bragging was […]
  • How I feel about climate change

    CJAB
    6 Oct 2014 | 4:54 pm
    Angry. Furious. Livid. And a just little bit sad. Well, I’m not pissed off with ‘climate change’ per se – that would be ridiculous. I am extremely pissed off with those who are doing their damnedest to prevent society from doing anything meaningful about it. The reason I’m thinking and writing about this at the moment is because […]
  • How to review a scientific paper

    CJAB
    29 Sep 2014 | 8:20 pm
    Following one of the most popular posts on ConservationBytes.com, as well as in response to several requests, I’ve decided to provide a few pointers for early-career scientists for reviewing manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Apart from publishing your first peer-reviewed paper – whether it’s in Nature or Corey’s Journal of Bullshit – receiving that first request to review a manuscript is […]
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    Conservation

  • Lizards’ feet adapt rapidly following ecological changes

    Jason G. Goldman
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    Evolution is an experiment played over millions of years, with endless failures, dead-ends, obstacles, impasses, and the occasional success. Species come and species go, wiped out by disaster, drought, famine, and sometimes-overzealous predators. Others simply miss out on a few too many mating opportunities, perhaps because populations of individuals are scattered too widely for potential
  • Can a legal rhino horn trade really save the rhinos?

    Dave Levitan
    28 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    Between 1990 and 2007, poachers killed about 15 rhinoceroses each year in South Africa. An explosion in demand for rhino horn, however, has changed that number dramatically: by last year, rhinos were dying at a rate of 2.75 every day, or more than 950 for the full year. Both Southern white and black rhinoceroses are prized for
  • There Will Be Blood

    Lindsey Doermann
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:25 am
    The pressure to reach for a gun to help save one animal from another is stronger than ever. And it has triggered a conservation problem from hell.
  • The Future Will Not Be Dry

    Lindsey Doermann
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    The most resilient cities aren't the ones that fight the water back—but the ones that absorb it.
  • Please Step Out of Your Car

    Lindsey Doermann
    24 Oct 2014 | 9:22 am
    With imaginative, green ways of getting around the city, cars may finally go the way of the horse and buggy.
 
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