Biodiversity

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  • The Buck Moths ride again

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:59 pm
    Last weekend was a whirlwind tour of the state. I was in northeast Ohio on Saturday to give a talk for Summit County Metro Parks (thanks for having me, Meghan!). Since that program wasn't until 7 pm, I headed up early to visit some iconic natural areas and make some images.In the photo above, we're looking off the massive bluffs of Hach-Otis State Nature Preserve. Fall color was nearing peak. I only regret that it was a rainy, overcast day. A bright blue sky day would have made the leaf color sizzle, but one takes what one gets.The following day, it was up early and off to southern Ohio at…
  • Climate Negotiators "Sleepwalking" in Bonn

    CBD News Headlines
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    BONN, Oct 22 2014 (IPS) - The 410,000 people who took to the streets for climate action in New York City during the U.N. Climate Summit would have been outraged by the 90-minute delay and same-old political posturing at the first day of a crucial round of climate treaty negotiations in Bonn at the World Congress Center.
  • Next big idea in forest conservation? Recognize the value of novel forests

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Jeremy Hance
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:45 am
    Think first before you eradicate non-native species says Dr. Ariel E. Lugo, the current director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry within the USDA Forest Service, based in Puerto Rico. Lugo, an accomplished ecologist, supports the idea that both native and non-native plants have important roles to play in conservation efforts.
  • Emails to Life Science undergraduates: field trips and research conversation opportunities

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Sent to AY2014/15 Sem 1 students reading LSM1103, LSM2251 & LSM3261. Field assistants for honours studentsSign up at: http://tinyurl.com/hons-fieldwork Our undergraduate research students are engaged in a variety of field observations following monkeys in the forest, studying freshwater streams, mapping the distribution of fruit trees important to civets, exploring trash in mangroves and a variety other work. This is an important period in their lives when they grapple with field work very seriously, examine the literature, evaluate their methods and collect data with specific objectives.
  • BHL Adds the National Library Board, Singapore as a New Member

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    23 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    Oriental Scops Owl, a species found in South Asia, including Singapore. A History of the Birds of Ceylon. v. 1. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37019175BHL is pleased to welcome the National Library Board, Singapore as a new member in BHL Central and simultaneously as BHL-Singapore, the newest node in Global BHL. The 16th member of the BHL Central consortium, BHL Singapore will help identify and digitize historical science literature from its collections and add these to the BHL’s online holdings, where all materials may be accessed free by the public.“The Biodiversity Heritage…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • The Buck Moths ride again

    21 Oct 2014 | 7:59 pm
    Last weekend was a whirlwind tour of the state. I was in northeast Ohio on Saturday to give a talk for Summit County Metro Parks (thanks for having me, Meghan!). Since that program wasn't until 7 pm, I headed up early to visit some iconic natural areas and make some images.In the photo above, we're looking off the massive bluffs of Hach-Otis State Nature Preserve. Fall color was nearing peak. I only regret that it was a rainy, overcast day. A bright blue sky day would have made the leaf color sizzle, but one takes what one gets.The following day, it was up early and off to southern Ohio at…
  • Fringed Gentians

    19 Oct 2014 | 7:49 pm
      As most plants decline, fringed gentians put on a showTHE COLUMBUS DISPATCHOctober 19, 2014NATUREJim McCormacThou blossom bright with autumn dew, And colored with the heaven’s own blue, That openest when the quiet light Succeeds the keen and frosty night.  — excerpted from To the Fringed Gentian by William Cullen BryantFall’s frosty days are here, and colder weather and shorter days have muted autumn’s spectacular wildflowers.Some flowers persist in a losing battle with Old Man Winter. The riotous bouquet of asters, colored in blue, white and purple, struggle mightily to…
  • Mergansers make a comeback in the Mountain State

    15 Oct 2014 | 6:39 pm
    A rocky mountain stream is punctuated by a quiet pool near Summersville, West Virginia. My friend Rachel Davis, who lives not far from here, showed me this little park back in late September. The place was full of biodiversity. Not long after exiting the car we saw a cool bird, and it was time to flip from the landscape lens to something with a bit more pulling power.A hen Common Merganser! To birders used to seeing this species in migration and winter, when they frequent large lakes and rivers, seeing one on a small creek might seem strange. But Common Mergansers nest along streams, and I…
  • A murderous, mobile lichen

    11 Oct 2014 | 7:32 pm
    I've written about the larvae of the Green Lacewing, Leucochrysa pavida, before, but never with (what I felt) were adequate photographs. These little creatures are very hard to image. They're small, mostly covered up, and when they expose themselves they're generally on the move.It was time to figure out how to overcome the photographic challenges. I'm involved in a project that features an essay about lacewing larvae, and a good photo was a must. Lacewing larvae of the type shown below are not rare, but can be a challenge to locate for reasons that will soon be obvious. I asked Chris Bedel,…
  • Support the Big Sit!

    8 Oct 2014 | 7:08 pm
    The Big Sit! is an effort to tally as many bird species as possible within 24 hours, from the confines of an officially designated 17-foot diameter circle. The Big Sit! concept was formalized by the New Haven (Connecticut) Bird Club in 1993, and later Bird Watcher's Digest stepped in to provide sponsorship. I wrote in more detail about Big Sits in last Sunday's Columbus Dispatch, RIGHT HERE. Big Sits are a lot of fun, and tax all of a birder's identification skills. They can also be used as an interesting way to raise funds for worthy causes. The Big Sit! occurs this coming weekend, October…
 
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Next big idea in forest conservation? Recognize the value of novel forests

    Jeremy Hance
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:45 am
    Think first before you eradicate non-native species says Dr. Ariel E. Lugo, the current director of the International Institute of Tropical Forestry within the USDA Forest Service, based in Puerto Rico. Lugo, an accomplished ecologist, supports the idea that both native and non-native plants have important roles to play in conservation efforts.
  • Saving the survivor: China scrambles to keep the finless porpoise from extinction

    Tiffany Roufs
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:35 am
    On the morning of July 14, 2002 Qi Qi ate breakfast as he always did. As the world’s only captive baiji – or Yangtze river dolphin – Qi Qi was something of a celebrity in China and his caretakers kept a close eye on his health. That care may explain why, after being injured by fishermen, he lived an impressive 22 years in the Freshwater Dolphin Research Center in Wuhan, China.
  • Top scientists raise concerns over commercial logging on Woodlark Island

    Jeremy Hance
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:05 am
    A number of the world's top conservation scientists have raised concerns about plans for commercial logging on Woodlark Island, a hugely biodiverse rainforest island off the coast of Papua New Guinea. The scientists, with the Alliance of Leading Environmental Scientists and Thinkers (ALERT), warn that commercial logging on the island could imperil the island's stunning local species and its indigenous people.
  • Indonesia developing mega coal mine five times larger than Singapore

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:00 am
    Global miner BHP Billiton and Indonesian partner PT Adaro are developing what could become the single largest mine in Indonesia in terms of land area, with BHP owning 75 percent. The IndoMet mine complex in Central and East Kalimantan provinces on Borneo comprises seven coal concessions, which cover 350,000 hectares, or about five times the size of Singapore.
  • Walking the walk: zoo kicks off campaign for orangutans and sustainable palm oil

    Jeremy Hance
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:08 am
    If you see people wearing orange this October, it might not be for Halloween, but for orangutans. Chester Zoo’s conservation campaign, Go Orange for Orangutans, kicks off this month for its second year. The campaign aims to raise money, and awareness, for orangutans in Borneo, which have become hugely impacted by deforestation often linked to palm oil plantations.
 
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Emails to Life Science undergraduates: field trips and research conversation opportunities

    otterman
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Sent to AY2014/15 Sem 1 students reading LSM1103, LSM2251 & LSM3261. Field assistants for honours studentsSign up at: http://tinyurl.com/hons-fieldwork Our undergraduate research students are engaged in a variety of field observations following monkeys in the forest, studying freshwater streams, mapping the distribution of fruit trees important to civets, exploring trash in mangroves and a variety other work. This is an important period in their lives when they grapple with field work very seriously, examine the literature, evaluate their methods and collect data with specific objectives.
  • Job: Research Assistant (National Carbon Stock Assessment; deadline 31 Oct 2014)

    otterman
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:01 am
    Research Assistant (Natural Sciences and Science Education) The National Institute of Education invites suitable applications for the position of Research Assistant on a 6-month contract at the Natural Sciences and Science Education (NSSE). Project Title: ANRICA – Carbon Stock Assessment Project Introduction: This is a 5-year national carbon accounting project in collaboration with the National Parks Board (NParks) with the aim of developing a national system to monitor carbon emissions/reductions resulting from loss/gain of vegetation due to changes in the land use over time. All greenery…
  • Jobs: 1) Research Fellow; 2) Research Assistant in Urban Ecology (Closing Date: 18 Oct 2014)

    otterman
    8 Oct 2014 | 3:47 am
    (1) Research Fellow in Urban Ecology Job Description The urban greenery and ecology group in the Department of Architecture at the School of Design and Environment invites application for a Research Fellow for a research project on biophilic design of townships in Singapore. The position is open for a 3-year appointment commencing in December 2014. The research domain covers the multiple disciplines of landscape architecture, urban planning and design and human-nature relationships using urban ecology as the overarching framework. Additional project information can be found here (Project 3).
  • JC Mendoza is “Crazy about crabs” (article in Nat Geo Extreme Explorer)

    otterman
    1 Oct 2014 | 6:36 pm
    Click to read JC Mendoza’s Nat Geo Extreme Explorer article in which he tells some stories from his many encounters during expeditions and examinations of crustacea; well done JC! Filed under: article
  • Fri 03 Oct 2014: 2.00pm @ DBS Conf Rm 2: Sinlan Poo on “Reproductive Ecology and Parental Care of a Southeast Asian Treefrog”

    weiting
    30 Sep 2014 | 11:46 pm
    PhD Defense Seminar cum Oral Examination “Reproductive Ecology and Parental Care of a Southeast Asian Treefrog” Sinlan Poo Graduate Student, Dept. of Biological Sciences, NUS Supervisor: Asst. Prof David Bickford Fri 03 Oct 2014: 2.00pm DBS Conference Room II (S1 Level 3, Mezzaine) All are welcome Abstract –  “Parental care is a reproductive strategy that increases fitness of parents by having more surviving offspring. The evolution of parental care is closely linked to sexual selection, mating systems, and other life-history characteristics of an organism. However, parental care can…
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • BHL Adds the National Library Board, Singapore as a New Member

    23 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    Oriental Scops Owl, a species found in South Asia, including Singapore. A History of the Birds of Ceylon. v. 1. http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/37019175BHL is pleased to welcome the National Library Board, Singapore as a new member in BHL Central and simultaneously as BHL-Singapore, the newest node in Global BHL. The 16th member of the BHL Central consortium, BHL Singapore will help identify and digitize historical science literature from its collections and add these to the BHL’s online holdings, where all materials may be accessed free by the public.“The Biodiversity Heritage…
  • National Agricultural Library (NAL) Joins BHL!

    22 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    We are pleased to announce that the USDA National Agricultural Library (NAL) has joined the Biodiversity Heritage Library as a BHL Affiliate. BHL has already ingested over 845,000 pages of NAL-digitized content made openly available within the Internet Archive. This formal partnership will allow us to strengthen our collection of agricultural-related content through direct collaboration with NAL.The National Agricultural Library (NAL) comprises one of the largest collections of materials devoted to agriculture in the world. Collection concentrations include the fields of agriculture,…
  • The Field Book Project: Increasing Access to Researchers' Fieldbooks

    21 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    American Archives Month celebrates the importance of archives and the work of archivists as they seek to collect, organize, and make accessible unique materials from our nation’s history. The Smithsonian Field Book Project is an exciting example of such work, an effort across SI departments and divisions to increase accessibility to field book content. Field books are important because they are the primary source records of flora, fauna, and ecosystem biodiversity research. They hold the first observations, thoughts, and reflections of scientific researchers when they venture out to…
  • The Art of Science at Museum Victoria & in BHL!

    17 Oct 2014 | 5:30 am
    This post originally published on the Museum Victoria blog to welcome the "Art of Science" exhibit to the museum and introduce audiences to BHL. Explore the latest BHL Australia developments in this past post. See the Museum Victoria collection in BHL here. The Art of Science exhibition presents the finest examples from Museum Victoria's remarkable collection of natural history artworks. These include rare books from the 18th and 19th centuries, field sketches from early colonial exploration of Australia's wildlife, and contemporary scientific photographs.The books on display contain…
  • BHL is Back

    16 Oct 2014 | 4:34 am
    Access to the BHL website has been restored! Thank you for your patience, and we apologize for the inconvenience.
 
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Beans - from plant to plate

    Ian Hicken
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:13 pm
    Beans are big here in Asturias, not in a huge way but in usage in all kinds of cookery. One of the traditional dishes is Fabada which is white beans with chorizo, black pudding and fat. Really not our cup of tea but very popular amongst the tourists and served in most restaurants. Being vegetarian, beans provide us with much needed protein and a stock that can be used all year round.We sow our own bean seeds (dried from the previous year) in April indoors. These are then transplanted into soil when they germinate and put outside to grow on. We are fortunate in so much that we do not have…
  • Autumn foraging: Chestnuts and Walnuts

    Ian Hicken
    12 Oct 2014 | 6:01 am
    We may have mentioned this before but walnuts and chestnuts are abundant around here. There are many fully grown trees on country lanes, on field boundaries and in cultivated plots. This year is a particularly good year for foraging as the trees are heavy with fruit.The good news for amateur foragers like us is that very few people collect these crops, preferring instead to purchase from commercial sellers on the markets: convenience I suppose. When out walking or cycling at this time of year we will take a small bag with us and collect what we find along the way. It is surprising how quickly…
  • If you go down to the beach today....

    Ian Hicken
    6 Oct 2014 | 6:32 am
    You're in for a big surprise... Well at least on the beach at Cuevas del Mar here in Asturias. This beach is about 5km from La Pasera and we occasionally walk to it from our house along the cliffs and through villages and country lanes. The area is peppered with caves (hence the name), many of which are shouting out to be explored.The beach hit the local news this year as the severe spring storms devastated the sand, taking most of it out to sea and leaving very little apart from pebbles. This small beach is popular during summer as it's a quiet bay is ideal and safe for swimming. The locals…
  • Dragonflies and damselflies in the garden

    Ian Hicken
    1 Oct 2014 | 12:34 am
    Throughout summer and early autumn here at La Pasera we are witness to the finely tuned aerobatic skills of dragonflies and damselflies are they navigate the garden, ponds and plants. Each year they lay their newly fertilised eggs on pond plants or directly into the water where they develop into nymphs.Most damselflies complete their life cycle in one year: egg, nymph, damselfly where as dragonflies can take up to 5 years depending on the climate, conditions and species. There are over 100 species in Europe and over 5000 worldwide.As they emerge from the water in their nymph stage, they cling…
  • Preserving, pickling and storing

    Ian Hicken
    25 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    The effort and hard work that goes into growing our own food is worth it on so many levels. We can be confident that no harmful chemicals, including pesticides and fungicides, were used, we know that the work we put into maintaining good quality soil will reap benefits in relation to plant disease and infestation resistance and, that the final produce is full of micro-nutrients and bursting with flavour.Typically, we often have a glut of produce at certain times of the year. Whether it be a beetroot, courgettes, soft fruit or root crops, we can always find a way of preserving this valuable…
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • It’s not all about cats

    CJAB
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:37 pm
    If you follow any of the environment news in Australia, you will most certainly have seen a lot about feral cats in the last few weeks. I’ve come across dozens of articles in the last week alone talking about the horrendous toll feral cats have had on Australian wildlife since European arrival. In principle, this […]
  • Australia should have a more vibrant ecological culture

    CJAB
    12 Oct 2014 | 9:58 pm
    I’ve always had the gut feeling that Australia punched above its weight when it comes to ecology and conservation. For years I’ve been confidently bragging to whomever might listen (mostly at conference pub sessions) that Australians have a vibrant academic and professional community of ecologists who are internationally renowned and respected. However, my bragging was […]
  • How I feel about climate change

    CJAB
    6 Oct 2014 | 4:54 pm
    Angry. Furious. Livid. And a just little bit sad. Well, I’m not pissed off with ‘climate change’ per se – that would be ridiculous. I am extremely pissed off with those who are doing their damnedest to prevent society from doing anything meaningful about it. The reason I’m thinking and writing about this at the moment is because […]
  • How to review a scientific paper

    CJAB
    29 Sep 2014 | 8:20 pm
    Following one of the most popular posts on ConservationBytes.com, as well as in response to several requests, I’ve decided to provide a few pointers for early-career scientists for reviewing manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals. Apart from publishing your first peer-reviewed paper – whether it’s in Nature or Corey’s Journal of Bullshit – receiving that first request to review a manuscript is […]
  • Farewell to an environmental hero: Tony McMichael

    CJAB
    25 Sep 2014 | 11:46 pm
    I had some sad news today – a visionary in human health and environmental integrity, Professor Tony McMichael, passed away last night from advanced influenza complications. Many people in the conservation field might not have heard of Tony, but rest assured he was one of the foremost thinkers and visionaries in the relationship between environment and […]
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    Conservation

  • How climate change is transforming winter birds

    Roberta Kwok
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    If you’ve noticed some new birds flitting around your backyard feeder, you’re probably not alone. Scientists have found that winter bird communities in eastern North America are shifting, thanks partly to climate change. Species that typically prefer warmer weather, such as chipping sparrows, Carolina wrens, and eastern bluebirds, are advancing north. The team analyzed data
  • Reef sharks may already be adapted for climate change

    Jason G. Goldman
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    The oceans are getting more and more acidic as they slurp up all the carbon dioxide that our cars and factories are churning into the air. What will happen to marine life as their environment becomes more and more diluted with CO2? To try to predict the affects of acidification on ocean biodiversity, some researchers
  • Ten conservation questions that satellites could help answer

    Dave Levitan
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    On Sunday this week, the Guardian reported that deforestation in the Brazilian portion of the Amazon rainforest spiked by 190 percent over the last couple of months. This ugly bit of news came via remote sensing techniques; satellites orbiting the earth are particularly useful tools for monitoring things like deforestation. In Brazil, new satellites may
  • Seabirds fly toward the light, get run over by cars

    Jason G. Goldman
    17 Oct 2014 | 5:00 am
    You shouldn’t litter. Everybody knows that rule, perhaps thanks to grisly images seabirds with six-pack soda rings around their necks. But not all pollution is made of trash. Birds can suffer from another, far more pervasive, far more subtle form of pollution. Instead of being made of paper and plastic, this form of pollution is
  • Bats like city living

    Roberta Kwok
    16 Oct 2014 | 8:30 am
    We’re used to sharing our cities with pigeons, ants, and the occasional skunk. In part of Australia, though, urban areas are increasingly overrun by thousands of bats — and a new study suggests that the animals’ inclination for city life is only growing. Urban development can splinter habitat and force out wildlife, but it also
 
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