Biodiversity

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  • Some late season bugs

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:02 pm
    My expeditions afield tend to produce far more images than I could ever share here. Normally, I have a specific subject or theme for posts, and that sometimes precludes using photos that I think are interesting, but fall outside of one of my writing topics.So here is a hodgepodge of various insect images, all taken in the last week or so. All of the subjects were found in central or southern Ohio.A Curve-tailed Bush Katydid, Scudderia curvicauda, looks into the camera. These whimsical-looking beasts make for great photography subjects. Note the katydid's ears - those dark oval pits just below…
  • Whaling commission shifts toward conservation agenda

    CBD News Headlines
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Portoroz, Slovenia - The 65th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) ended today with a landmark decision to impose better controls over any future whale hunts conducted for the purposes of so-called scientific research.
  • Illegal tropical deforestation driven globally by “agro-conversion”

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Nearly 50 percent of tropical deforestation to make room for commercial agriculture between 2000 and 2012 was done so illegally. That’s a key finding of a report published by the U.S.-based nonprofit organization Forest Trends looking at the global tide of tropical forest “agro-conversion.”
  • Job: Museum Officer at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM)

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    weiting
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:03 pm
    The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) of the National University of Singapore invites applications for a Museum Officer position. For more information about the Museum Officer opening, visit the job opportunity page at News From Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum. The closing date for applications is 10 October 2014.Filed under: Uncategorized
  • A Crusade to Save the Golden Lion Tamarin

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    Post by Grace Costantino with significant contributions from Field Book Project blog post, "Field Notes from a Battle Against Extinction," by Sonoe Nakasone.We are in the midst of Hispanic Heritage Month, an annual celebration of the "histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America." This is also an excellent opportunity to celebrate Hispanic biodiversity. We're kicking things off with a look at one of Brazil's most iconic primates, the Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia).The Golden Lion…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • Some late season bugs

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:02 pm
    My expeditions afield tend to produce far more images than I could ever share here. Normally, I have a specific subject or theme for posts, and that sometimes precludes using photos that I think are interesting, but fall outside of one of my writing topics.So here is a hodgepodge of various insect images, all taken in the last week or so. All of the subjects were found in central or southern Ohio.A Curve-tailed Bush Katydid, Scudderia curvicauda, looks into the camera. These whimsical-looking beasts make for great photography subjects. Note the katydid's ears - those dark oval pits just below…
  • Ground Skink, Scincella lateralis

    15 Sep 2014 | 7:30 am
    A Ground Skink, Scincella lateralis, (sometimes called the Little Brown Skink) rests, quite appropriately, on the ground.While in Adams County two weekends ago, Mark Zloba of the Cincinnati Museum Center and an employee at the Edge of Appalachia Preserve, mentioned an area where he always sees Ground Skinks. Would I be interested in seeing them? You betcha! Everyone has their nemesis creatures - animals that just seem to elude one, no matter how hard you try. Well, this skink was my nemesis Ohio lizard. I can't say that I really knocked myself out looking for one, but in year's past I…
  • The lost Bird Project film, and discussion

    10 Sep 2014 | 6:46 pm
    September 1 marked the centennial of the passing of the very last Passenger Pigeon, Martha. Her death spelled the end for a species once so plentiful that no one who lived at the peak of the Passenger's Pigeons' abundance could ever have imagined that it would disappear, completely and utterly, and entirely due to the actions of people. There are many lessons to be learned from this tragic tale, and Martha and her kind should not be forgotten.The Grange Insurance Audubon Center is hosting a showing of the film The Lost Bird Project, followed by a panel discussion about the pigeon,…
  • The amazing Amorpha Borer strikes again!

    8 Sep 2014 | 8:29 pm
    A "weedy" unkempt bank of the mighty Ohio River, in Adams County, Ohio. That's Kentucky on the far side. I was down in the hill country for the past four days, much of which was spent attending a fabulous workshop on the singing insects (Orthoptera), taught by Wil Hershberger and Lisa Rainsong. More on that later.We had some time on either end of the workshop to do some exploring, and we didn't let any grass grow under our feet. Some amazing finds were made, including the animal featured in this post. John Howard and I were riding together, and when we pulled into this site and saw the…
  • Reddish Egret in Ohio!

    5 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Major kudos to Steve Landes! He found an incredibly rare bird (for Ohio) last Wednesday, and performed in a highly efficient manner in regards to getting word out. Within a half hour or so, just about everyone in Ohio's birding community knew about the Reddish Egret that Steve had found.Ground zero for the egret - the City of Columbus' new upground reservoir in northwestern Delaware County, about 40 minutes northwest of Columbus. The egret has been frequenting shallow ponds on the reservoir's north side - I marked the spot where I saw it late Wednesday afternoon. I don't think the presence of…
 
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    CBD News Headlines

  • Whaling commission shifts toward conservation agenda

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Portoroz, Slovenia - The 65th meeting of the International Whaling Commission (IWC) ended today with a landmark decision to impose better controls over any future whale hunts conducted for the purposes of so-called scientific research.
  • The deepest cuts

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    ON SEPTEMBER 23rd 120-odd presidents and prime ministers will gather in New York for a UN meeting on climate change
  • Tropical rabbitfish a threat to Mediterranean Sea ecosystems

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The tropical rabbitfish, which have devastated algal forests in the eastern Mediterranean Sea, pose a major threat to the entire Mediterranean basin if their distribution continues to expand as the climate warms, a new study warns.
  • For Trees Under Threat, Flight May Be Best Response

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The whitebark pine grows in the high, cold reaches of the Rocky and Sierra Mountains, and some individuals, wind-bent and tenacious, manage to thrive for more than a thousand years.
  • Rare Zambian Tree Faces Exploitation Because of Legal Loophole

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    RUFUNSA, Zambia, Sep 19 2014 (IPS) - Steven Nyambose used to sell charcoal for a living until he discovered that the trees could be more lucrative in another way - through cutting them down and selling the logs to international buyers.
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Illegal tropical deforestation driven globally by “agro-conversion”

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    11 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Nearly 50 percent of tropical deforestation to make room for commercial agriculture between 2000 and 2012 was done so illegally. That’s a key finding of a report published by the U.S.-based nonprofit organization Forest Trends looking at the global tide of tropical forest “agro-conversion.”
  • Meet the newest enemy to India's wildlife

    Jeremy Hance
    11 Sep 2014 | 9:35 am
    A boom in infrastructure and population has forced India's wildlife to eke out a creative existence in an increasingly human-modified environment. Big cats such as the leopard are often spotted within large cities, on railway tracks, and sadly, on India's burgeoning and sprawling road network.
  • Next big idea in forest conservation? Harness the power of marketing

    Jeremy Hance
    11 Sep 2014 | 8:26 am
    As a whole, conservationists have been slow to adapt the strategies of marketing or to market conservation at all. Dr. Diogo Veríssimo, a researcher who works at the interface between social and natural sciences, with a focus on behavior change and evidence-based conservation, thinks this needs to change.
  • Bolivian vice president proposes unprecedented agricultural expansion (PART 1)

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    10 Sep 2014 | 12:45 pm
    On August 14, the Bolivian Vice President, Alvaro Garcia Linera, made a startling announcement: by 2025, Bolivia was going to make two striking developments - first, it would expand all cultivated land to 2.5 times its present area, and second, it would triple food production from 15 to 45 million tons.
  • A path to becoming a conservation scientist

    Rhett Butler
    4 Sep 2014 | 7:12 pm
    The path to finding a career often involves twists and turns. Serendipity is important — one rarely anticipates what small events, chance occurrences, and seeds of inspiration will spur decisions that lead to pursuing one job or another. For Zuzana Burivalova, a PhD candidate based at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich), the road to becoming a tropical forest ecologist began as a child in a small Czech Republic village with a foldout children's book about rainforests.
 
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Job: Museum Officer at the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM)

    weiting
    19 Sep 2014 | 5:03 pm
    The Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) of the National University of Singapore invites applications for a Museum Officer position. For more information about the Museum Officer opening, visit the job opportunity page at News From Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum. The closing date for applications is 10 October 2014.Filed under: Uncategorized
  • Seshadri’s research featured on Mongabay.com

    mingko
    18 Sep 2014 | 8:34 am
    We are playing catch-up on news about Seshadri, one of the PhD students in the Evolutionary Ecology and Conservation Lab who is back in Singapore after spending the summer in India doing field work. Seshadri’s master’s research on the effects of selective logging on frogs in the Kalakad Mundanthurai Tiger Reserve was recently published in Biotropica and featured on the conservation website Mongabay.com. The reserve is part of the Western Ghats, which along with Sri Lanka is a biodiversity hotspot that is home to many threatened endemic amphibians. Seshadri found…
  • Thu 25 Sep 2014: 4.00pm @ DBS CR1 – Danwei Huang on “Phylogenies, fossils, and the challenge of conserving evolutionary diversity”

    weiting
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:23 am
    Filed under: envirostudies, faculty, seminar
  • Thu 18 Sep 2014: 2.00pm @ DBS CR1 – Hou Chia Yi on Modelling infectious disease emergence in the context of conservation, economics and development

    mingko
    10 Sep 2014 | 8:03 pm
    Department of Biological Sciences, NUS Qualifying Examination ” Modelling infectious disease emergence in the context of conservation, economics and development” HOU Chia Yi Graduate Student, Dept. of Biological Sciences National University of Singapore Thu 18 Sep 2014: 2.00pm DBS Conference Room 1 (S3 Level 5) Supervisor: Asst Prof Roman Carrasco Co-supervisor: John D. Mumford All are welcome Abstract: – Infectious diseases are emerging in real time, with the current epidemic of ebola in West Africa taking the headlines at more than 1,900 human deaths over the course of…
  • NUS Biodiversity Crew & alumnus at the Society for Conservation Biology (Asia) conference

    otterman
    9 Sep 2014 | 10:06 pm
    Marcus Chua reports the list of NUS Biodiversity Crew and alumnus who presented or was present at the 3rd Asia Regional Conference of the Society for Conservation Biology – Asia Section – what a party! Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz Adeline Seah Alison Wee Becky Shu Chen Catharina Gallacher Cedric Tan Dan Friess Dan Richards David Bickford Edward Webb Enoka Priyadarshani Kudavidanage Fatma Gözde Çilingir (Gogo) Felix Lim Jacob Phelps Kelvin Peh Liang Song Horng Luke Gibson Madhu Rao Marcus Chua Mary Rose “Mingko” Posa Mary Ruth Low Nega Tassie Abate Rachel Oh Reuben Clements…
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • A Crusade to Save the Golden Lion Tamarin

    18 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    Post by Grace Costantino with significant contributions from Field Book Project blog post, "Field Notes from a Battle Against Extinction," by Sonoe Nakasone.We are in the midst of Hispanic Heritage Month, an annual celebration of the "histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America." This is also an excellent opportunity to celebrate Hispanic biodiversity. We're kicking things off with a look at one of Brazil's most iconic primates, the Golden Lion Tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia).The Golden Lion…
  • BHL-Australia is back!

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:00 am
    The first published illustration of the Duck-billed Platypus, from The Naturalist's Miscellany, or Coloured figures of natural objects, Vol. 10, George Shaw, 1799.For the past year, BHL-Australia has been very quiet. So quiet, in fact, you would be forgiven for forgetting we exist (unless of course you read about our contribution to the new BHL website).Why the silence? Because, in 2013, we ran out of funding.Our digitisation work didn’t stop, however. Deep in the Museum Victoria library, six dedicated volunteers (supervised by equally dedicated library staff) continued to scan and process…
  • BHL Valued by Historians

    11 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    Many people tend to think of BHL as a resource for scientists. While it’s true that scientists use BHL to find species descriptions and data about earth’s flora and fauna, they are not the exclusive beneficiaries of this wealth of knowledge.BHL contains more than half a millennia's worth of records about the discovery of life on our planet. It is valuable both for the raw data it provides and for the context and history it relates. It is not just a repository of biodiversity information. It also captures the evolution of our understanding, appreciation, and interactions with the natural…
  • Exploring Arachnids with Harry Potter and Logan Pierce

    4 Sep 2014 | 5:30 am
    If you’re a Harry Potter fan, then you know what the three unforgivable curses are. And if you’ve seen the movies, you’ll remember the scene where Mad-eye Moody demonstrates those curses in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. If you’re recalling the scene now, you’re probably thinking, “Yeah, he tortured and killed a spider.”Amblypygid. The Royal Natural History. v. 6, sec. 11 (1896). http://biodiversitylibrary.org/page/29153712If that’s what you’re thinking, you’re wrong (if you managed to avoid the Harry Potter craze and have no idea what we’re talking about, just…
  • A Global Discussion about Martha, Extinction and Conservation

    3 Sep 2014 | 9:43 am
    Thanks to everyone who tuned in for our #Martha100 TwitterChat with @NMNH (National Museum of Natural History) and @SILibraries (Smithsonian Libraries) yesterday! The chat was a commemoration of the death of the last passenger pigeon, Martha (died Sept. 1, 1914), and a discussion on extinction, conservation, and the importance of historic literature to these fields.We had some fantastic questions and discussions, as well as great contributions from @fieldmuseum, @SmithsonianArch (Smithsonian Archives), @birdernewjersey (aka Rick Wright, a regular guest blogger for BHL), and @SiobhanLeachman…
 
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Walking in Asturias: Torre del Friero

    Ian Hicken
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:20 am
    The Picos National Park covers a wide geographical area within the Spanish regions of Asturias, Cantabria and Castilla-Leon. The park in itself is divided into three areas or massifs: the Western Massif also Known as Cornion is the closest to La Pasera and where the lakes are. The other two massifs are: The Urrieles that occupies the largest and central part of the national park and the tallest peaks within it: The Andara in the East is the smallest of the three massifs. September is a very good time to go walk in Asturias as the weather is still hot, the light quality is fantastic and there…
  • A weekend photowalk around the village -1

    Ian Hicken
    14 Sep 2014 | 4:07 am
    We walk most days, either to the coast via many of the coastal and farming tracks that lead to the cliffs or further afield through neighbouring villages and pastures. Which ever way we go we always wander our way through the village paths and caminos. It is easy to forget how attractive our little village can be. Here are a few photographs of the countryside around our village, we'll feature more in subsequent posts so bookmark or subscribe now.View towards El SueveCows grazing next to La PaseraPastureRio GuadamiaOur coastlineLa PaseraSetting sunVillage housesCaminos and footpathsDevelopment…
  • Foraging for the wild peach

    Ian Hicken
    9 Sep 2014 | 10:26 am
    We always look forward to September in Asturias. The weather is warm, not too hot, gentle winds, not too strong, and misty dew-fresh mornings. The walnuts trees are laden with fruit, the hazelnuts begin to shed their fruit, the brambles offer up an abundance of blackberries and the wild Asturian peach (Piesco) is ready for harvesting.The wild peach is small, the skin is slightly tougher than commercial peaches and the sweetness is not guaranteed however the intense peach flavour more than makes up for any other shortfalls. The peaches grow on small trees on the edges of fields and tracks…
  • In search of sciurus vulgaris... the red squirrel

    Ian Hicken
    5 Sep 2014 | 1:53 am
    On several occasions we have seen a red squirrel in the garden here at La Pasera but they are very shy, quick and eager to climb high to avoid the cats Wentworth and Gawber who wouldn't think twice about trying to capture one. This picture is from a rare chance I got to photograph one in the garden after Gawber had chased it up a tree.Luis had business in Gijon recently and I was aware from previous visits that there were a small colony of red squirrels in and around the park of  Parque de Isabel La Católica  : a perfect opportunity to try and get close up and personal. The…
  • Visiting a traditional market at Porrua de Llanes

    Ian Hicken
    31 Aug 2014 | 10:54 pm
    Once a year in a small village not too far from home is one of the most interesting fiestas in our area; Mercau Tradicianal. The market runs for two days, usually over the last weekend in August thereby making the most of the holiday makers who flock to Asturias in the month of August. The fair has only been running since the early 1990s but it has the feel of something with more history. It is loosely billed as a celebration of life before the industrial revolution.The market takes place in the small village of Porrua which has a central park that has a well kept circle of entangled and…
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Demonising the hellbender

    Corey Bradshaw
    18 Sep 2014 | 3:30 pm
    Not ‘Hellraiser’, FFS – ‘hellbender’ Here’s one by my new PhD student, Leah Collett: – I have never heard of the hellbender before. “Brilliant name”, I thought. Then I saw it mentioned again a few days later, in company with honey badgers and blue-footed boobies, in a recent article on why we need to see nature as useless in order to ‘save’ it. So what is it? The hellbender is a species of salamander found in eastern North America, the only species of its genus it turns out, and one of only three left in its family (Cryptobranchidae…
  • Attention Ecologists: Journal Ranking Survey

    Corey Bradshaw
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:41 pm
    In the interest of providing greater transparency when ranking the ‘quality’ of scientific journals, we are interested in collecting ecologists’ views on the relative impact of different ecology, conservation and multidisciplinary journals. If you’re a publishing ecologist, we want your personal opinion on a journal’s relative rank from this sample of 25 peer-reviewed journals. Please do not consult Impact Factors or other journal rankings to decide – just go with your ‘gut’ feeling. We chose a sample of 25 authoritative journals in the field…
  • Evidence-based conservation advocacy can work

    Corey Bradshaw
    14 Sep 2014 | 9:39 pm
    Colin ‘Captain Hook’ Barnett Just before knock-off time last Friday, I received some inspiring news. It’s not often in conservation science that the news is good, so even small wins are deliciously welcome. Unless you’ve been out bush for the last few days or completely ignored the news services, you would have heard that Western Australia has decided not to go ahead with its moronic shark-culling programme. It all came down to the Western Australia Environmental Protection Authority‘s recommendation to the state government that it should not proceed with the…
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXV

    Corey Bradshaw
    7 Sep 2014 | 2:30 pm
    Here are 6 more biodiversity cartoons for your conservation-humour fix (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, cartoon, cartoons, economy, evolution, extinction, overpopulation, sustainability
  • High-altitude ecology

    Corey Bradshaw
    28 Aug 2014 | 3:35 am
    A constant hazard in the Tibetan Plateau – yakjam I’ve been out of the social-media loop for a few weeks, hence the abnormally long interval since my last post. As you might recall, I’ve been travelling overseas and most recently blogged from Monterey, California where I was attending a symposium on invasion genetics. The next phase of my travels couldn’t have been more different. The reason I couldn’t access the blog was because I was well behind the Great Firewall of China. I was, in fact, in the Tibetan region of Gansu and Sichuan Provinces in western China…
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    Conservation

  • Should pollinator research focus on regions with malnutrition?

    Lindsey Doermann
    19 Sep 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Pollination research has focused on places like California and New Jersey, but poverty-stricken areas will be hardest hit by pollinator declines.
  • Pretty parrots in peril

    Lindsey Doermann
    18 Sep 2014 | 7:42 am
    Poachers snatch parrots from the wild to sell as pets, and about 30 percent of the world’s parrot species are in jeopardy. But do the thieves tend to catch the most attractive parrots, or do they simply go for the birds that are easiest to bag?
  • Plankton might evolve to survive climate change

    Jason G. Goldman
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    Here’s two things we know: One, the oceans are getting warmer. Two, the oceans are becoming more acidic. Here’s one thing we don’t know: what those two things mean for phytoplankton. The tiny microscopic plants form the base of the marine food web, and are responsible for about half of the planet’s primary production –
  • Save the eagles to save the vultures?

    Dave Levitan
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:00 am
    We are used to the calls for conservation up and down a given food chain. Declines in small animals, say, could limit food supply for larger and larger animals up until the apex predators start to suffer. When it comes to predators that occupy the same general niche, logically one might see an increase in
  • Sharks prefer healthy reefs, healthy reefs need sharks

    Jason G. Goldman
    12 Sep 2014 | 5:00 am
    Stop fishing, and there will be more fish. That’s the idea, at least. Indeed, sharks were more abundant in no-fishing zones in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) than in spots where fishing is allowed according to a new study just published by a group of Australian researchers. But the story is actually more
 
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