Biodiversity

  • Most Topular Stories

  • A rough day on Lake Erie

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:24 pm
    Lake Erie, as seen from the fishing access parking lot just east of the power plant in Eastlake, Ohio.I traveled to the Cleveland area and specifically Holden Arboretum yesterday, to give a program for the Blackbrook Audubon Society. The subject, fittingly, was "Birding Ohio's North Coast", and the talk largely outlines the Lake Erie Birding Trail guidebook, which was released earlier this year.The program was in the evening, but I went up early to meet with Brian Parsons, the Holden Arboretum's Director of Planning and Special Projects. The arboretum is engaged in some very exciting work,…
  • 'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in South Africa

    CBD News Headlines
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Reuters) - A tiny shrimp equipped with large, candy-striped eyes to ward off predators has been discovered in South African waters, the University of Cape Town said on Friday.
  • Jane Goodall: 5 reasons to have hope for the planet

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Rhett Butler
    19 Nov 2014 | 3:29 pm
    Jane Goodall is not only arguably the most famous conservationist who ever lived, but also the most well-known and respected female scientist on the planet today. Her path to reach that stature is an unlikely as it is inspiring. Told to 'never give up' by her mother, Goodall set out in her 20s to pursue her childhood dream: to live with animals in Africa. By the time she was 26 she doing just this.
  • Antonia Monteiro weighs in on the colour blue on NPR

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    Free of teaching (it’s Reading Week), David Bickford was surfing the net, perusing NPR and happy to see colleague Antonia Monteiro quoted in a piece about blue color in animals [“How Animals Hacked The Rainbow And Got Stumped On Blue,” by Rae Ellen Bichel. NPR, 12 Nov 2014]. “Everywhere you look, organisms have been inventing different solutions to creating the same color,” says Antonia Monteiro, who studies butterfly wings in Singapore. Monteiro says a lot of animals use different materials to get the same effect. Butterfly wings are sheathed in reflective…
  • The Latest News from BHL

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    Sharks, Passenger Pigeons, Scientific Illustrations, Crowdsourcing, National Agricultural Library, GBIF, and Semantic Metadata. What do all these things have in common? They're all BHL news stories from the past few months!Get the latest BHL project news in our latest quarterly report and newsletter! Don't get our newsletter? Sign up today!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • A rough day on Lake Erie

    19 Nov 2014 | 9:24 pm
    Lake Erie, as seen from the fishing access parking lot just east of the power plant in Eastlake, Ohio.I traveled to the Cleveland area and specifically Holden Arboretum yesterday, to give a program for the Blackbrook Audubon Society. The subject, fittingly, was "Birding Ohio's North Coast", and the talk largely outlines the Lake Erie Birding Trail guidebook, which was released earlier this year.The program was in the evening, but I went up early to meet with Brian Parsons, the Holden Arboretum's Director of Planning and Special Projects. The arboretum is engaged in some very exciting work,…
  • Odd looks of jumping spiders belie fearless predators

    16 Nov 2014 | 6:08 am
    A mustached jumping spider will stalk its mealCOLUMBUS DISPATCHNovember 16, 2014NATUREJim McCormacJumping spiders are the extroverts of the arachnid world.Most spiders prefer to stay out of sight and out of mind. Many remain well-concealed or emerge under cover of darkness.That is a good thing for the legions of arachnophobes. Such people would rather not know that more than 600 species of spiders occur in Ohio and that they are the most abundant predatory animals in the state.Many species are outrageous in appearance. The mustached jumping spider (Phidippus mystaceus) resembles a cross…
  • Sandhill Cranes at Jasper-Pulaski

    14 Nov 2014 | 8:18 pm
    A gaggle of birders packs the viewing platform at Jasper-Pulaski Fish & Wildlife Area near Medaryville, Indiana. I made a whirlwind trip here last weekend, connecting with a friend from Chicago, Joyce Pontius. We were there, primarily, to observe the noisy and conspicuous spectacle of thousands of Sandhill Cranes on temporary hiatus from their southbound journeys.I highly recommend this trip. From my town of Columbus, Ohio, it is only about a four hour drive, and the Chicagoans need only travel half that distance. Jasper-Pulaski is in easy driving range from much of the Midwest, and…
  • Robins, waxwings, and honeysuckle

    10 Nov 2014 | 6:34 pm
    Amur honeysuckle, Lonicera maackii, cloaks the understory of an Ohio woodland. This plant, and a few other closely related species, would get my vote as worst invasive species of upland habitats. This post is meant only as a (mostly) pictorial offering of evidence as to how the honeysuckle gets scattered far and wide. If you would like to read in more detail about the evils of these shrubs, CLICK HERE.The first photo in this post was made in early spring, when the honeysuckle was just leafing out. Later would come (admittedly) very showy flowers. Pretty flowers and beautiful fruit are the…
  • River Otters squeaking like squeeze toys

    4 Nov 2014 | 7:16 pm
    Now here's something one doesn't hear everyday. Laura Hughes recently sent along another fabulous trail cam video that she and her husband made in the backwoods of Monroe County in eastern Ohio. This one features a trio of frolicking River Otters, Lontra canadensis. As you'll see, they approach the camera quite closely; in fact, one of them brushes it with its whiskers. Turn the volume up, though - the otters are delivering their amusing little squeaky calls, and those are sounds that most people have never heard, I dare say.Video by David and Laura Hughes
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    CBD News Headlines

  • 'Star-gazing' shrimp discovered in South Africa

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    (Reuters) - A tiny shrimp equipped with large, candy-striped eyes to ward off predators has been discovered in South African waters, the University of Cape Town said on Friday.
  • Leopards know how to thrive in human territory

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    BENGALURU: Leopards in human habitations needn't always have strayed in or are in conflict with humans. A pioneering GPS-based study of leopards in India has found that these big cats have strategies to thrive in human habitations.
  • Climate fund receives $9.3bn pledge

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Thirty nations meeting in Berlin have pledged $9.3bn (£6bn) for a fund to help developing countries cut emissions and prepare for climate change.
  • Europe's birds are disappearing

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Sparrows and starlings are disappearing at an alarming rate in Europe. Richard Inger of the University of Exeter talks to DW about what is behind the decline and what can be done to stop it.
  • Is a ban on GM crops more harmful than growing them?

    20 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    UK's chief scientist has said GM crops could provide plentiful food with less damage to the environment and at lower costs. But does that mean we should grow them?
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Jane Goodall: 5 reasons to have hope for the planet

    Rhett Butler
    19 Nov 2014 | 3:29 pm
    Jane Goodall is not only arguably the most famous conservationist who ever lived, but also the most well-known and respected female scientist on the planet today. Her path to reach that stature is an unlikely as it is inspiring. Told to 'never give up' by her mother, Goodall set out in her 20s to pursue her childhood dream: to live with animals in Africa. By the time she was 26 she doing just this.
  • A tale of 2 Perus: Climate Summit host, 57 murdered environmentalists

    Jeremy Hance
    18 Nov 2014 | 2:39 pm
    On September 1st, indigenous activist, Edwin Chota, and three other indigenous leaders were gunned down and their bodies thrown into rivers. Chota, an internationally-known leader of the Asháninka in Peru, had warned several times that his life was on the line for his vocal stance against the destruction of his peoples' forests, yet the Peruvian government did nothing to protect him—or others.
  • Using games to teach kids the value of nature and philanthropy

    Rhett Butler
    18 Nov 2014 | 8:46 am
    Kids are spending more time using tablets and smart phones for learning and entertainment. But hours spent gaming, Tweeting, and playing on Instagram and Facebook, may mean less engagement with nature, potentially making it more difficult for conservation organizations to inspire and influence the next generation of donors and decision makers. Given the state of the world's environment, that is a troubling thought.
  • A nature photographer's dream: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society

    Rhett Butler
    17 Nov 2014 | 9:02 am
    Julie Larsen Maher has what many wildlife photographers would consider a dream job: staff photographer for the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), a non-profit that runs five zoos and aquariums in New York City as well as numerous site-based field programs in the U.S. and overseas. As staff photographer, Maher helps tell the stories behind WCS's conservation work, which ranges from veterinary procedures with Bronx Zoo animals to working with local communities in remote parts of Zambia to protect wildlife.
  • Surprising reasons to be optimistic about saving forests

    Rhett Butler
    13 Nov 2014 | 5:27 pm
    In the 1990s, the world watched with alarm as vast tracts of tropical rainforest were torn down for timber and croplands, dug up for minerals and energy, and flooded for hydroelectric projects. Conservation groups, governments, philanthropists, and institutions like the World Bank collectively spent billions of dollars on programs to stop the carnage. But as viewed from satellites high above Earth's surface, those efforts barely dented deforestation rates.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Antonia Monteiro weighs in on the colour blue on NPR

    otterman
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:00 am
    Free of teaching (it’s Reading Week), David Bickford was surfing the net, perusing NPR and happy to see colleague Antonia Monteiro quoted in a piece about blue color in animals [“How Animals Hacked The Rainbow And Got Stumped On Blue,” by Rae Ellen Bichel. NPR, 12 Nov 2014]. “Everywhere you look, organisms have been inventing different solutions to creating the same color,” says Antonia Monteiro, who studies butterfly wings in Singapore. Monteiro says a lot of animals use different materials to get the same effect. Butterfly wings are sheathed in reflective…
  • “The behaviour of giant clams” – Pamela Soo & Peter Todd, 2014

    otterman
    19 Nov 2014 | 4:51 pm
    Pamela who has not strayed far from marine life, says, “yay, clams! five years later, and most of the searching and editing on his part, my prof [Peter Todd] has finally found a home for my chunky, lengthy stackofa thesis! all the final year moments of madness distilled into nineteen pages of a scientific journal.” If you’re keen to peek into the madness, see the paper at Springer.com” (full download). Congratulations and thanks Pam and Pete! I’ll be using it in the LSM1103 Biodiversity mollusca lecture myself! Photo by Creative Kids.Filed under: journal
  • Tue 11 Nov 2014: 6.30pm @ Brookhaven – Book Launch of “Dynamic Environments of Singapore” by Dan Friess & Grahame Oliver (NUS Geography)

    otterman
    1 Nov 2014 | 8:35 pm
    From Dan Friess in Geography, On the 11th of November Grahame Oliver and I are having a book launch for our new textbook “Dynamic Environments of Singapore”, which was published earlier this year. I’d like to invite you to attend – there will be copies available for purchase ($30 – bargain!). Please find the details on the FASS Environment Cluster blog. An event co-organized by the FASS Environment Cluster and the Singapore Research Nexus.Filed under: book
  • Prof Chou Loke Ming officially retires today!

    otterman
    31 Oct 2014 | 5:13 am
    Prof Chou Loke Ming officially retires today – the end of an era which his Reef Ecology Study Team and many students in the department will continue to reminisce about for decades. I thought I’d share his commencement speech delivered to the graduating class on 10th July 2014. I loved his “coconut speech” delivered with his quintessential humour, dignity and an understated deep feeling. Thanks for the memories Prof! Prof Chou Loke Ming heads to TMSI next (See “Marine conservation veteran continuing passion after retirement,” by Audrey Tan. The Straits Time, 15…
  • Emails to Life Science undergraduates: field trips and research conversation opportunities

    otterman
    13 Oct 2014 | 11:07 pm
    Sent to AY2014/15 Sem 1 students reading LSM1103, LSM2251 & LSM3261. Field assistants for honours studentsSign up at: http://tinyurl.com/hons-fieldwork Our undergraduate research students are engaged in a variety of field observations following monkeys in the forest, studying freshwater streams, mapping the distribution of fruit trees important to civets, exploring trash in mangroves and a variety other work. This is an important period in their lives when they grapple with field work very seriously, examine the literature, evaluate their methods and collect data with specific objectives.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • The Latest News from BHL

    21 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    Sharks, Passenger Pigeons, Scientific Illustrations, Crowdsourcing, National Agricultural Library, GBIF, and Semantic Metadata. What do all these things have in common? They're all BHL news stories from the past few months!Get the latest BHL project news in our latest quarterly report and newsletter! Don't get our newsletter? Sign up today!
  • Lepidochromy: Butterfly Transfer Prints

    20 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    This post was originally published on the Smithsonian Libraries' blog. It was written by Daria Wingreen-Mason, Special Collections Technical Information Specialist in the Joseph F. Cullman 3rd Library of Natural History.Dorsal and ventral views of specimen from Waller’s Butterflies collected in the Shire Valley East Africa.Horace Waller was an English missionary and anti-slavery activist in the 19th century. In 1859 Waller joined the Universities’ Mission to Central Africa (UMCA). As Lay Superintendent to the UMCA, Waller befriended the famous missionary Dr. David Livingstone and botanist…
  • Digital Object Identifiers and BHL

    19 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    The importance and need for unique, persistent identifiers for reliable access to published literature has become widely accepted, and the literature for the biodiversity informatics community is no exception.  For published works, these generally take the form of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs). BHL has been consistently assigning CrossRef DOIs to monographic publications for three years. However, the number of items in BHL with DOIs remains relatively small with just over 68,000 assigned to date.  In addition to the remaining monographs, BHL now also has over 140,000 articles…
  • Rejuvenating Centuries' Old Botany with Phytogeography

    13 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    Here's a word of the day for you: Phytogeography.Phytogeography is a branch of biogeography that investigates the geographic distribution of plants and the effect that the earth's surface has on that distribution. To go further down the rabbit hole, biogeography studies the distribution of species and organisms now and throughout time. This research reveals important interdependencies between geology, climate, dispersal and evolution.Wallace's map, showing the zoogeographical regions of the world. The Geographical Distribution of Animals. v.1 (1876).
  • Crowdsourcing and BHL: Current Projects that Allow Users to Help Us Improve Our Library!

    6 Nov 2014 | 5:30 am
    Recent crowdsourcing initiatives are revolutionizing scientific research, allowing the public to help scientists and researchers document, identify, and better understand biodiversity.For example, the Atlas of Living Australia’s FieldData program allows anyone to contribute sightings, photos and observational data to help researchers and natural resource management groups collect and manage biodiversity data. Birds Australia is using this data to help record sightings of Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoo to inform conservation initiatives for this endangered species.As another example, in 2013 a…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Tales from Toriello

  • A clifftop walk

    Ian Hicken
    15 Nov 2014 | 1:28 am
    Tomason Cliffs near our village (Toriello) looking westwards.I have always been attracted by the sea with its changing moods, sounds, colours, smells and the way in which it reflects light under different conditions. If in addition to all of that you add the stunning ragged limestone cliffs we get on the stretch of the Asturian coast near La Pasera,you could easily understand how little it takes for me to forget all I am doing and simply go for a walk along the cliffs. This is what I did this afternoon, I simply could not resist taking this walk knowing there was a storm coming towards Spain…
  • How we prepare the vegetable plot for Winter

    Ian Hicken
    6 Nov 2014 | 2:47 am
    As the days get shorter we start noticing a drop in the temperatures, especially first thing in the morning, that contrast with the hot sunshine we experience in the middle of the day. This warmth encourages a spur of growth not only in the vegetable plot but also in the garden and miniature gardens where the Lithops or pebble plants start to bloom.The hot and dry weather we tend to get by the coast at this time of the year encourages the last of the aubergines and peppers to ripen whilst the Winter crops start coming into their own. In another post I will write about what is happening…
  • Cycling in Asturias: El Fito viewing platform

    Ian Hicken
    30 Oct 2014 | 11:28 am
    Ribadesella with the Sueve Mountains in the backgroundCycling in Asturias is a great way to discover this beautiful part of the country although it presents some challenges: being a mountainous region. You need a certain level of fitness to be able to face the challenge that some hills present.You are never too far from a hill even when you choose the coastal routes.When you cycle off road, the paths tend to be poorly signed and at times you need to carry your bicycle as some of the paths are not very well maintained.Mountain biking really applies to off road cycling in Asturias but in spite…
  • Mosaicos La Pasera, an update.

    Ian Hicken
    25 Oct 2014 | 12:27 am
    As a mosaicist and whilst living at La Pasera, I have designed and created numerous decorative pebble mosaics that now adorn paths and a small terrace. My passion for this mosaic genre stems from my love for pebbles and a holiday we once took in the Greek Island of Rhodes where we saw many decorative mosaics been used as pavement. After returning home, Ian got me as a present, a book by Maggy Howarth titled "the art of pebble mosaic". Since then, I have completed a good number of mosaics that decorate our garden and have had several as commissions.For my latest pebble mosaic of a flower pot…
  • Beans - from plant to plate

    Ian Hicken
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:13 pm
    Beans are big here in Asturias, not in a huge way but in usage in all kinds of cookery. One of the traditional dishes is Fabada which is white beans with chorizo, black pudding and fat. Really not our cup of tea but very popular amongst the tourists and served in most restaurants. Being vegetarian, beans provide us with much needed protein and a stock that can be used all year round.We sow our own bean seeds (dried from the previous year) in April indoors. These are then transplanted into soil when they germinate and put outside to grow on. We are fortunate in so much that we do not have…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    ConservationBytes.com

  • Get serious about divestment

    CJAB
    20 Nov 2014 | 4:33 pm
    We are a sensitive and conflict-avoiding lot, aren’t we? Most scientists I know absolutely dread reprisals of any form, whether they are from a colleague commenting on their work, a sensationalism-seeking journalist posing nasty questions, or a half-wit troll commenting on a blog feed. For all our swagger and intellectual superiority complexes, most of us would rather […]
  • Give some flair to your scientific presentation

    CJAB
    18 Nov 2014 | 4:06 am
    – As the desert spring came to the great Centre Red, Scores of sandalled folk from tin birds descend-ed. Alice Town had been invaded, Bearded alike and unshorn-legged.   They sat and stared at words and the odd trend. Billies boiled to get them through to day’s end They swapped bush stories that made good sense, Trying to understand Aussie […]
  • Innate cruelty and exploitation: does biodiversity stand a chance?

    CJAB
    10 Nov 2014 | 9:30 am
    Earlier this year I took my daughter to the South Australian Museum, as I often do on weekends. We usually have lunch at the Art Gallery, and then wander the various levels of the Museum at a pace suitable for a 7-year old. The South Australia biodiversity floor is her favourite. Of course I’m a little […]
  • InvaCost – estimating the economic damage of invasive insects

    CJAB
    6 Nov 2014 | 6:50 pm
    This is a blosh (rehash of someone else’s blog post) of Franck Courchamp‘s posts on an exciting new initiative of which I am excited to be a part. Incidentally, Franck’s spending the week here in Adelaide. Don’t forgot to vote for the project to receive 50 000 € public-communication grant! – Climate change will make winters milder […]
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXVI

    CJAB
    3 Nov 2014 | 8:35 pm
    Here are 8 more biodiversity cartoons (with a human population focus, given recent events) for your conservation-humour fix (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, cartoon, cartoons, extinction, family planning, human overpopulation, sustainability
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Conservation

  • Unlikely partners: Rhino poaching & sea snake exploitation

    Jason G. Goldman
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    Each month, hundreds of squid fishing vessels return to port in Vietnam loaded not just with squid, but also with sea snakes harvested from the Gulf of Thailand. Each month, the seven major snake processing facilities move an average of 6,500 kilograms of sea snakes, which are sold for between $10 and $40 per kilogram,
  • Does climate change spell trouble for airlines?

    Roberta Kwok
    20 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    As if airplane travel weren’t already bad enough, scientists have found yet another problem that might arise with climate change. In warmer air, planes could have more trouble taking off and may need to shed cargo or passengers to get aloft. Airlines already deal with this issue: planes have specific weight restrictions depending on the
  • Sea star wasting disease is caused by a virus

    Jason G. Goldman
    19 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    For nearly a year and a half, sea stars – in particular, those of the taxonomic family Asteroidea have been suffering from mass die-offs. The cause of the widespread sea star mortality has been uncertain, so it has simply become known as “sea star wasting disease” (SSWD). But now a large group of researchers from
  • Rain storms leave Harlem River flush with pollution

    Dave Levitan
    18 Nov 2014 | 6:00 am
    The obvious effects of big rainstorms, tropical storms, and hurricanes are bad enough. But hidden in the aftermath of storms like Hurricane Sandy—and even much, much smaller storms that don’t get a name or a Wikipedia page—is the nefarious combined sewer overflow, or CSO. This is about as bad as it sounds: many older cities
  • Conserving the smallest mammals on the tallest peaks

    Lindsey Doermann
    14 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    Mount Kilimanjaro is one of Africa's best-known geological features, but it is also home to some of its least-known animals
 
Log in