Biodiversity

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  • Mosaics in and around our garden.

    Tales from Toriello
    Ian Hicken
    2 Apr 2014 | 12:35 am
    Those of you who follow our blog will know by now that I am passionate about all things mosaic related. My mosaic journey really started when following a holiday in the Greek island of Rhodes where we visited numerous sites with beautiful mosaics Ian got me a book on pebble mosaics written by the British based artist Maggy Howarth.During our time at La Pasera, I have had an opportunity to explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of mosaic art both relating to pebble and roman style mosaics. My abilities as a mosaicist continue to evolve with each individual piece I design and make.In my…
  • Thu, 24 Apr 2014, 3.00pm @ CR1: The giant jellyfish (Nemopilema nomurai) blooms in the East Asian Marginal Seas

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    amandathn
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:46 pm
    Filed under: seminar
  • Barred owlets

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:29 pm
    Last Monday, I got an email from my editor at the Columbus Dispatch, Cindy Decker, telling me of some special residents of her neighborhood. As she lives along a well-wooded ravine only fifteen minutes from my place, I buzzed over that evening, camera in hand.It took no time at all to locate the hootiferous beasts - Barred Owls! Here, the male gazes inscrutably at your narrator. These owls, as we shall better see, are quite used to people and pay us little mind.The female, who was perched nearby, curiously watches some people walk below her lofty perch.As Columbus' neighborhoods, especially…
  • Charting a Course for Survival, or Oblivion?

    CBD News Headlines
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    UXBRIDGE, Canada, Apr 22 2014 (IPS) - Hopefully, on Earth Day today, high-level ministers from all countries are thinking about what they can bring to the table at a key set of meetings on climate change in early May
  • Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai of WildTrack Profiled in Duke Environment Magazine

    The Pimm Group
    pgadmin
    9 Apr 2014 | 3:26 pm
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • Barred owlets

    23 Apr 2014 | 5:29 pm
    Last Monday, I got an email from my editor at the Columbus Dispatch, Cindy Decker, telling me of some special residents of her neighborhood. As she lives along a well-wooded ravine only fifteen minutes from my place, I buzzed over that evening, camera in hand.It took no time at all to locate the hootiferous beasts - Barred Owls! Here, the male gazes inscrutably at your narrator. These owls, as we shall better see, are quite used to people and pay us little mind.The female, who was perched nearby, curiously watches some people walk below her lofty perch.As Columbus' neighborhoods, especially…
  • A fine kettle of fish, Pt. II

    20 Apr 2014 | 5:39 pm
    This rainbow darter, Etheostoma caeruleum, is aptly named and would look right at home in a tropical fish tank.Not long ago, I wrote an account of a recent excursion to Little Darby Creek, which can be seen HERE.I was indeed fortunate to accompany Mac Albin of Franklin County Metroparks, Anthony Sasson of the Ohio Chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and John Tetzloff of the Darby Creek Association. No one knows the fishes of Big and Little Darby creeks like these guys do.We caught lots of fish, all of which were released back into the waters. We were "fish-watching"; temporarily detaining some…
  • Magee Marsh's legendary boardwalk

    18 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    This mile long elevated wooden boardwalk is one of the most famous trails in North America. Winding through a 30-acre patch of swamp forest and wetland at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area, it is a destination for tens of thousands of birders, especially in May. In May 2012, traffic counter surveys conservatively estimated over 66,000 visitors made the pilgrimage to the "Bird Trail". The number may have been even higher, like around 75,000 or more people. And nearly all of them are birders, of every stripe and level of expertise. They come to witness the magic of Neotropical birds…
  • A fine kettle of fish!

    16 Apr 2014 | 6:33 pm
    Little Darby Creek, in southwestern Franklin County, Ohio. The Little Darby, and its sibling stream the Big Darby, are among the most aquatically diverse streams in the Midwest. The riffle pictured above is especially noteworthy, particularly for its diversity of small colorful fish known as darters.I was in the stream last Sunday morning, with some of the best aquatic ecologists around.John Tetzloff (L) and Mac Albin work a seine in the creek's swift waters, while Anthony Sasson inspects a captured fish in the holding tank.John is the longtime president of the Darby Creek Association, and a…
  • Earth Day program!

    15 Apr 2014 | 8:08 pm
    The spectacular vista from Buzzard's Roost Rock in the Edge of Appalachia Preserve, Adams County, Ohio.Next Tuesday, April 22nd, is Earth Day. This annual celebration to promote our environment and its protection began in 1970, and millions of people worldwide participate in various Mother Nature-friendly activities on this day. I was delighted to be asked to give a program for Columbus Audubon on Earth Day, and enthusiastically accepted. The program begins at 7 pm, and will take place at the Grange Insurance Audubon Center at 505 W. Whittier Street in Columbus. It's free, and all are…
 
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    CBD News Headlines

  • Charting a Course for Survival, or Oblivion?

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    UXBRIDGE, Canada, Apr 22 2014 (IPS) - Hopefully, on Earth Day today, high-level ministers from all countries are thinking about what they can bring to the table at a key set of meetings on climate change in early May
  • Plotting GM contamination

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    [NEW DELHI] A new algorithm for rapid screening of transgenic content could help cheaper and easier detection of genetic contamination of traditional crop varieties, food and feed, researchers say.
  • Nutrition and the new sustainable development goals

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Multi-stakeholder partnerships should be a cornerstone of the post-2015 development framework if we are to tackle malnutrition globally
  • Scientists say climate change will likely make climbing Everest riskier, less predictable

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    NEW DELHI - Climbing to the roof of the world is becoming less predictable and possibly more dangerous, scientists say, as climate change brings warmer temperatures that may eat through the ice and snow on Mount Everest.
  • Dormant plant seeds allow for greater species diversity

    22 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    DURHAM, N.C., April 18 (UPI) -- Seeds that sprout quickly are a boon for farmers and gardeners who value productivity and efficiency, but if diversity is your bag then you'll want to stick with wild plants featuring especially dormant seeds.
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    The Pimm Group

  • Zoe Jewell and Sky Alibhai of WildTrack Profiled in Duke Environment Magazine

    pgadmin
    9 Apr 2014 | 3:26 pm
  • VIDEO: Microsoft Research’s Lucas Joppa Discusses Computational Ecology and Conservation

    pgadmin
    29 Dec 2013 | 12:38 pm
    Lucas Joppa, Photo by Microsoft ResearchIn a revealing interview, linked at the bottom of this post, Lucas Joppa of Microsoft Research discusses how he came to unite his passion for conservation with the tools of computational ecology to help protect the world’s biodiversity. He also details how the models he helped developed have influenced conservation decision-making, including how remote sensing, spatial data, and modeling helped him and other scientists conclude that 67% of plant species live on just 17% of the earth’s land, a very important finding for conservation science.
  • Jenkins joins Brazil’s Instituto de Pesquisas Ecológicas (IPÊ)

    pgadmin
    29 Oct 2013 | 7:01 am
    Clinton JenkinsClinton Jenkins (2002) has joined the Instituto de Pesquisas Ecológicas (IPÊ) (Institute for Ecological Research), a Brazilian-born NGO located in Nazaré Paulista, São Paulo state, Brazil. Jenkins will continue his current research program, while focusing more on the Atlantic Coastal Forest biodiversity hotspot. A new line of research will be assessing how the land use around the Cantareira System of water reservoirs affects water quality. The Cantareira System is an interlinked series of water reservoirs that supply water to about 9 million people in São Paulo. A…
  • Video: Microsoft Research’s Lucas Joppa’s “A Prediction Engine for the Planet”

    pgadmin
    17 Oct 2013 | 12:01 pm
    Lucas Joppa (2009) presents a fascinating modeling and prediction program with important applications for science, conservation, and biodiversity. Developed as part of his work at Microsoft Research, Joppa’s Prediction Engine for the Planet serves “is a computational system capable of delivering predictions about key planetary parameters – from biodiversity to carbon, and from the climate to crop yields – in the browser and on the cloud.” You can learn more about Microsoft Research and Lucas’ work by clicking here.
  • Video: Stuart Pimm Interviewed on Wall Street Journal Live

    pgadmin
    10 Oct 2013 | 10:01 am
    The Wall Street Journal’s live webcast, WSJ Live interviewed Dr. Pimm about a new paper published in Nature on the effects of climate change in major cities around the world, and the rapidly approaching time lines for these effects. Click here for the Nature article.
 
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Illegal logging makes up 70 percent of Papua New Guinea's timber industry

    Jeremy Hance
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    Corruption, weak governance, and powerful timber barons are illegally stripping the forests of Papua New Guinea, according to a new report from the Chatham House. The policy institute finds that 70 percent of logging in Papua New Guinea is currently illegal, despite the fact that 99 percent of land is owned by local indigenous communities.
  • Small monkeys take over when big primates have been hunted out in the Amazon

    Jeremy Hance
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:28 am
    The barbecued leg of a spider monkey might not be your idea of a sumptuous dinner, but to the Matsés or one of the fifteen tribes in voluntary isolation in Peru, it is the result of a successful hunt and a proud moment for the hunter's family. However, a spider monkey tends to have only a single infant once every 30 months, which necessarily limits the number of adult monkeys available to subsistence hunters.
  • Behind the scenes of Showtime's blockbuster series on climate change

    Rhett Butler
    18 Apr 2014 | 11:11 am
    For years climate change activists and environmentalists have been clamoring for a high-profile, high-impact TV series about climate change to make Americans more aware of an issue that will affect billions of people around the globe in coming decades. This week they finally got it when Showtime released the first episode of Years of Living Dangerously, a big-budget TV series featuring a number of Hollywood's biggest stars as reporters and corespondents.
  • Next big idea in forest conservation? Maps for the masses

    Jeremy Hance
    18 Apr 2014 | 7:04 am
    Mark Mulligan makes maps for the masses. In his work on tropical forests, Mulligan uses GIS, modeling, remote sensing, and lab experiments to turn research into datasets and policy support systems, which are available online for use in development, decision-making, and education.
  • Is Aru safe? Indonesia suspends plan to clear half the islands' forests

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    17 Apr 2014 | 1:55 pm
    Aru, an area made up of about ninety-five low-lying islands in the Maluku province of eastern Indonesia, has suspended a plan to clear half of its total forest cover for sugar cane. However, the island paradise is still not safe from large-scale deforestation, according to a report from Mongabay-Indonesia.
 
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • BHL Technical Advisory Group meets at the Missouri Botanical Garden

    17 Apr 2014 | 6:00 am
    For the 2014 BHL Technical Meeting, the BHL Technical Advisory Group (TAG) met at the Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG) (2-3 April 2014) with William Ulate (Technical Director) and Martin Kalfatovic (BHL Program Director). Also joining the meeting were the BHL tech team based at MBG (Trish Rose-Sandler and Mike Lichtenberg), Carolyn Sheffield (BHL Program Manager), Bianca Crowley (BHL Collections Coordinator, by phone), and Connie Rinaldo (BHL Executive Committee Vice-Chair, by phone).From left: William Ulate, Siang Hock Kia, Carolyn Sheffield, Mike Lichtenberg, John Mignault, Keri Thompson,…
  • PDF Generation restored...

    16 Apr 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Dear BHL users:We are glad to inform you that our IT staff has solved the technical difficulties found with our PDF Generation process.  We have tested the service and it seems to be working well.We apologize for the inconveniences this may have caused you. Please let us know through our Feedback form if you find any issues with this or any other BHL functionality again.Regards,William UlateBHL Technical Director
  • BHL and EOL team up for NESCent Research Sprint

    27 Mar 2014 | 6:00 am
    Research teams at the NESCent-EOL-BHL Research Sprint. Photograph by Cyndy Parr.In early February, the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent) hosted the EOL-BHL Research Sprint. NESCent, based in Durham, NC, is a non-profit science center supporting research in the evolutionary sciences. NESCent emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to research, and so the idea behind the Sprint was to put together teams of programmers and life scientists to expose each other to questions and ways of thinking that they might not necessarily consider in their normal work. Informaticians could…
  • First Meeting of the Mining Biodiversity project

    20 Mar 2014 | 6:00 am
    Meet our international partners to extract data from BHL Mining Biodiversity (MiBio project) is one of the projects that won during the third round of the transatlantic Digging Into Data Challenge, a competition aiming to promote the development of innovative computational techniques that can be applied to big data in the humanities and social sciences. The project is an international collaboration between the National Centre for Text Mining (UK), Missouri Botanical Garden (US) and Dalhousie University’s Big Data Analytics Institute (Canada)…
  • 2014 Annual BHL meeting held in New York City, March 10-11, 2014

    18 Mar 2014 | 5:30 am
    BHL member and affiliates met in New York City for the 2014 Annual Meeting (10-11 March 2014). The annual meeting is a chance for the leaders of BHL members and affiliates to learn what is happening around BHL and to give updates from their own institutions.This year, the meeting was held jointly by the New York Botanical Garden and the American Museum of Natural History. The first day of meetings was hosted by Susan Fraser, Director of the LuEsther T. Mertz Library of the New York Botanical Garden. The morning session of the meeting included the 2014 BHL Program Director's Report by Martin…
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    Under The Banyan

  • After a baby and a book Under the Banyan is back

    mikeshanahan
    9 Apr 2014 | 12:58 am
    I’ve been away from this blog for nearly a year, but I have returned today to bring it back to life. It has been a busy time. My main reason for putting the blog on hold is pictured below, hiding … Continue reading →
  • Pastoralists in the Media: Three ‘E’s please

    mikeshanahan
    13 May 2013 | 2:15 am
    Once upon a time, not so long ago, we were all mobile. Movement was what enabled our ancestors to track resources that were here today, gone tomorrow. In parts of the world where water, pasture or good hunting are not … Continue reading →
  • Climate change: Teens teach where others don’t reach

    mikeshanahan
    29 Apr 2013 | 7:26 am
    A 13-year-old girl interviewed me last week about my job, through which I communicate with journalists around the world about climate change and other environmental issues. She is part of the generation that worries about such things, according to a … Continue reading →
  • A changing climate demands change in narratives

    mikeshanahan
    23 Apr 2013 | 7:27 am
    Last year I wrote — here and here — about my study of how media portrayals of pastoralists in China, India and Kenya can contribute to policy narratives that limit people’s resilience to climatic variability. IIED has now published my … Continue reading →
  • Unhappy endlings: What tales of the last days of extinct and dying species can bring to our own story

    mikeshanahan
    2 Apr 2013 | 1:37 am
    They are all now dead and can never be replaced but at least they got names. Martha, Benjamin and Incas… Booming Ben and Lonesome George. They were endlings, each one the last known member of its species. Their names remind … Continue reading →
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Simple pleasures...

    Ian Hicken
    23 Apr 2014 | 10:41 am
    It was Luis' birthday this week and we celebrated in the way we have become accustomed: each choosing what you want to do for your own day. We stopped buying presents many years ago and believe that if we really want something and can afford it, we buy it at any time of the year, the same applies for Christmas. It fits in with our thinking that: life is short; we should all make the most of what we have; less is often more. Somehow, we seem to need less and value simpler pleasures.The day started well with our friend Birgitta arriving with a glorious chocolate-covered birthday cake with…
  • Horse racing on the beach in Ribadesella

    Ian Hicken
    19 Apr 2014 | 5:44 am
    Horses have always been a part of the landscape in and around Ribadesella. As far back as pre-history, images of horses were drawn with primitive paints in the Tito Bustillo cave in town: one of which has been adopted as a logo for tourism.Rodrigo De Balbin Behrmann / AFP/Getty ImagesHorses have worked the land for centuries and have coped well with the heavy clay ground and rocky outcrops that feature widely in the landscape. There are still working horses around the village and many roam the fields and pastures throughout Asturias. Sadly a few of these are destined for the horse meat trade…
  • Update on vegetables and fruit

    Ian Hicken
    14 Apr 2014 | 2:24 pm
    Anyone who grows their own produce will know that there is always something to be done if you are going to crop anything decent during the year. From sowing seeds, to digging over the soil, pruning, pricking out seedlings, weeding and watching for infections or infestations, it takes the full 12 months of the year to keep the garden productive.The pear trees are beginning to flower but the greengage is still struggling after all this time. The orange tree is beginning to get fruit of note and lots of it. The fruit bushes are doing reasonable well to say we re-planted the raspberries and…
  • The terrace is finished...well almost.

    Ian Hicken
    10 Apr 2014 | 10:53 am
    One of the first tasks we undertook in the garden way back in 2007 was to mark out the main access into the garden and a large terrace where we could sit, with space for friends and dining out. We have made it, after all this time it is nearing completion. All we need now is to plant Esquisetum in what was to be a fire pit, and construct a couple of benches from beams we have for seating.The path leads from the top terrace through flower beds and rockery onto the large terrace. Punctuated with mosaic fish and water-lillies, that lead you to the small wildlife pond.We are already enjoying the…
  • Mosaics in and around our garden.

    Ian Hicken
    2 Apr 2014 | 12:35 am
    Those of you who follow our blog will know by now that I am passionate about all things mosaic related. My mosaic journey really started when following a holiday in the Greek island of Rhodes where we visited numerous sites with beautiful mosaics Ian got me a book on pebble mosaics written by the British based artist Maggy Howarth.During our time at La Pasera, I have had an opportunity to explore the technical and aesthetic aspects of mosaic art both relating to pebble and roman style mosaics. My abilities as a mosaicist continue to evolve with each individual piece I design and make.In my…
 
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • South Australia’s tattered environmental remains

    Corey Bradshaw
    15 Apr 2014 | 7:47 pm
    South Australia State budget percentage expenditures for health, education and environment Yesterday I gave the second keynote address at the South Australia Natural Resource Management (NRM) Science Conference at the University of Adelaide (see also a brief synopsis of Day 1 here). Unfortunately, I’m missing today’s talks because of an acute case of man cold, but at least I can stay at home and work while sipping cups of hot tea. Many people came up afterwards and congratulated me for “being brave enough to tell the truth”, which both encouraged and distressed me…
  • The environmental Abbott-oir

    Corey Bradshaw
    8 Apr 2014 | 3:30 pm
    “What?”, my wife exclaimed, “Is this guy Satan1 himself?”. Within 6 months in office, the Abbott-oir has: attempted to remote World Heritage protection for a large expanse of Tasmanian forest; vowed to reinstate logging in Tasmania on a large scale; broken promise to fund Sumatran rhino recovery; decided to dump 3 million tonnes of dredging spoil on the Great Barrier Reef; scrapped management plans for most of the nation’s representative system of marine protected areas; rollbacked protection in national parks, including allowing logging, grazing, fishing and…
  • The lengths Abbott will go to destroy environmentalism

    Corey Bradshaw
    6 Apr 2014 | 3:08 pm
    Over at ALERT (Alliance of Leading Environmental Researchers & Thinkers), Bill Laurance has highlighted yet another major blow to environmentalism in Australia: the Coalition’s latest push is to ban consumer boycotts of environmentally damaging corporations. The following press release went out this morning. You can also find more details on the Abbott proposal here and here. – An international scientific group has decried an Australian government proposal to ban consumer boycotts of corporations that damage the environment. “It’s clearly a bad idea,” said William…
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXIII

    Corey Bradshaw
    3 Apr 2014 | 4:51 pm
    Here are another 6 biodiversity cartoons for your conservation pleasure/pain (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, carbon, carbon footprint, cartoon, cartoons, climate change, fencing, national parks, threatened species, water
  • Eye on the taiga

    Corey Bradshaw
    23 Mar 2014 | 6:37 pm
    Dun! Dun, dun, dun! Dun, dun, dun! Dun, dun, daaaaah! I’ve waited nearly two years to do that, with possibly our best title yet for a peer-reviewed paper: Eye on the taiga: removing global policy impediments to safeguard the boreal forest (recently published online in Conservation Letters). Of course, the paper has nothing to do with cheesy Eighties music, underdog boxers or even tigers, but it does highlight an important oversight in world carbon politics. The boreal forest (also known as taiga from the Russian) spans much of the land mass of the Northern Hemisphere and represents…
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    Conservation

  • Island biodiversity theory doesn’t apply to metaphorical islands

    Jason G. Goldman
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    The equilibrium theory of island biogeography is three things. One, it’s a mouthful of jargon. Two, it’s long been one of the theoretical pillars of conservation science. Three, it might be completely useless, at least for those islands not surrounded by water. That’s according to new research published last week in Nature. To understand just
  • Twitter analysis shows climate skeptics shout loudest

    Dave Levitan
    22 Apr 2014 | 6:00 am
    An analysis of twitter responses to the IPCC report yields insights into who talks loudest, and to whom, about the major climate science report.
  • Which shall live and which shall die? Conservation triage for birds

    Jason G. Goldman
    18 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    There’s a struggle at the core of wildlife conservation between our desire to help and our ability to help. It’s a mismatch between the seemingly unending flow of species from existence to extinction and the limited resources at our disposal for use in stopping that flow. On the one hand, we could try to spread
  • Air pollution in Asia intensifies Pacific storms

    Janet Fang
    17 Apr 2014 | 10:42 am
    Aerosols from Asian air pollution are intensifying cyclones over the Pacific Ocean, potentially altering weather patterns halfway around the globe.
  • Could golf courses actually boost conservation?

    Jason G. Goldman
    16 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Many think that golf courses negatively impact local ecology. New research casts doubt on that assumption and argues that sometimes they might even help.
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