Biodiversity

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  • Wildlife Diversity Conference: March 11

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    27 Jan 2015 | 7:01 pm
    Mark your calendars for Wednesday, March 11. That's the date of this year's Ohio Wildlife Diversity Conference, hosted by the Ohio Division of Wildlife. This is the BIG one - about 1,000 nature enthusiasts of all stripes come together for what must be one of the largest one-day natural history conferences anywhere. The conference location couldn't be more convenient - it's in Columbus and right off the freeway at the cavernous Aladdin Shriners' Complex at 3850 Stelzer Road. CLICK HERE to register.There are exhibitors, artists, vendors, authors, and legions of like-minded people all rooting…
  • Monarch butterfly population rises a little, but still perilously low

    CBD News Headlines
    28 Jan 2015 | 4:00 pm
    The world's migrating monarch butterfly population has bounced back slightly from its record low last year, but the new numbers are still the second smallest on record.
  • Community tourism fills niche around Tambopata Nature Reserve

    featured news from mongabay.com
    Tiffany Roufs
    29 Jan 2015 | 9:53 am
    When Víctor Zambrano retired from the military and returned to his family’s old homestead outside the fast-growing jungle town of Puerto Maldonado in Peru, he got an unpleasant surprise. Strangers had moved in and cleared the trees to raise cattle. As Zambrano tells it, he ran up the Peruvian flag, chased the invaders off, and set to work planting 19,000 native tree seedlings.
  • Four days in a Wilderness First Aid Course

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    29 Jan 2015 | 4:40 am
    I spent the first of four days in a wilderness first aid training course with colleagues from the Department of Biological Sciences (aka NUS Biodiversity Crew). This course brings everyone up to speed and prepares us for difficult situations in the field. Ted, Amy, Morgany, Poh Moi, Frank, JC & Tommy were able to make it today and already this group makes me feel confident about student care on local or overseas field trips. Many of us have had some first aid training, either formally or from field situations. However, our exposure to incidents have been relatively low (thankfully so)…
  • Hundreds of Thousands of BHL Images Available for Viewing and Tagging in Flickr

    Biodiversity Heritage Library
    29 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    BHL Images in the new IA Book Images Flickr StreamTwo Ways to Access BHL Images in Flickr Images from the books and journals of the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) are now more readily available in Flickr than ever before. Thanks to the work of researcher Kalev Leetaru and developers at Smithsonian Libraries (SIL), Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG), and the Internet Archive (IA), over 1 million images from BHL are being added to the IA's Book Images Flickr stream. This work began in the summer of 2014 when Leetaru extracted over 13 million images from 2 million IA public domain books…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • Wildlife Diversity Conference: March 11

    27 Jan 2015 | 7:01 pm
    Mark your calendars for Wednesday, March 11. That's the date of this year's Ohio Wildlife Diversity Conference, hosted by the Ohio Division of Wildlife. This is the BIG one - about 1,000 nature enthusiasts of all stripes come together for what must be one of the largest one-day natural history conferences anywhere. The conference location couldn't be more convenient - it's in Columbus and right off the freeway at the cavernous Aladdin Shriners' Complex at 3850 Stelzer Road. CLICK HERE to register.There are exhibitors, artists, vendors, authors, and legions of like-minded people all rooting…
  • The bizarre world of the supranivean zone (snow insects)

    25 Jan 2015 | 9:50 am
    Yesterday was a work day, more or less. I left before the crack of dawn to meet other planning committee members who are involved with organizing Mothapalooza. We spent a good chunk of the day at the Eulett Center in Adams County tightening down various nuts and bolts before opening registration in a few weeks. Special thanks to Mary Ann Barnett for ably overseeing this event, and efficiently running yesterday's meeting. This will be our third Mothapalooza, and you'll not want to miss it. CLICK HERE for a brief recap of the last one. I'll let you know when registration opens.As I entered the…
  • Annual winter Raptor Day at the Wilds

    18 Jan 2015 | 4:44 pm
    Our group pauses along a little-traveled road through wide open spaces on American Electric Power land bordering the Wilds. We were looking for various raptors, Short-eared Owls, and whatever might come along.Yesterday was the 11th annual Ohio Ornithological Society field trip to the Wilds. The OOS began this traditional field trip soon after its founding in 2004, and it has remained wildly popular. About 120 birders from all over the state showed up yesterday, and that's the maximum number that can be handled. It's been like that about every year. The only one that I can recall significant…
  • Lapland Longspurs, galore!

    14 Jan 2015 | 7:22 pm
    A flurry of Lapland Longspurs noshes on specially ground cracked corn. All birds should have it so good.Last winter - the "polar vortex" freezeout - I wrote about a fantastical place in Delaware County, Ohio that hosted thousands, and thousands, of Snow Buntings. That post is RIGHT HERE. The birds' hosts are Mike and Becky Jordan, and they have the art of attracting birds of wide open spaces down to a science. Scatter some 50 lbs. of cracked corn (a day!!) along the driveway and other select spots, and sit back and watch the show. Their farmhouse is surrounded by big fields, and when the…
  • Update: Tree & Shrub Workshop

    12 Jan 2015 | 4:27 pm
    In my last post, I announced the upcoming Tree & Shrub Workshop to be held Saturday, February 28 at the Caesar Creek Lake Visitor Center in Warren County. For details, either scroll down to the last post, or CLICK HERE.Chief organizer Kathy McDonald told us today that we already have 73 people, including paid attendees and helpers/speakers. Wow, that didn't take long. We had originally planned on about 75 people, but can expand to comfortably accommodate at least a few dozen more. We want everyone to learn more about woody plants, have fun hanging around like-minded people, and enjoy some…
 
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    featured news from mongabay.com

  • Community tourism fills niche around Tambopata Nature Reserve

    Tiffany Roufs
    29 Jan 2015 | 9:53 am
    When Víctor Zambrano retired from the military and returned to his family’s old homestead outside the fast-growing jungle town of Puerto Maldonado in Peru, he got an unpleasant surprise. Strangers had moved in and cleared the trees to raise cattle. As Zambrano tells it, he ran up the Peruvian flag, chased the invaders off, and set to work planting 19,000 native tree seedlings.
  • Accounting for natural capital on financial exchanges

    Jeremy Hance
    26 Jan 2015 | 11:01 am
    Last month, Norway's stock exchange, the Oslo Børs, introduced a way for investors to use their money to promote sustainability. A new list by the stock exchange highlights green bonds, financial products issued by companies to raise capital for environmentally friendly projects. Notably, the list requires that issuing companies obtain and publicize outside opinions on the projects' environmental features.
  • Indigenous territories play dual role as homelands and protected areas

    Tiffany Roufs
    22 Jan 2015 | 8:57 am
    Indigenous communities claim—and scientific evidence increasingly shows—that indigenous forested territories are as well protected as, or better protected than, government-designated parks. In areas under pressure from roads or development projects, deforestation rates are sometimes even lower in indigenous territories than in official protected areas.
  • Palm oil giant launches online platform to support zero deforestation push

    Rhett Butler
    22 Jan 2015 | 6:22 am
    Wilmar, the world's largest palm oil company, has unveiled a tool it says will help eliminate deforestation from its global supply chain. The tool is an online dashboard that maps the company's supply chain, including the names of locations of its refineries and supplier mills.
  • Sundarbans still reeling from effects of December oil spill

    Jeremy Hance
    21 Jan 2015 | 12:01 pm
    Last month, an estimated 350,000 liters of fuel oil spilled into the Sundarbans delta on the Bay of Bengal. An oil tanker that had collided with a cargo vessel on December 9th sank into the Shela River, spilling its oil into a protected sanctuary for the rare and endangered Irrawaddy dolphins (Orcaella brevirostris) and the Ganges river dolphins (Platanista gangetica).
 
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Four days in a Wilderness First Aid Course

    otterman
    29 Jan 2015 | 4:40 am
    I spent the first of four days in a wilderness first aid training course with colleagues from the Department of Biological Sciences (aka NUS Biodiversity Crew). This course brings everyone up to speed and prepares us for difficult situations in the field. Ted, Amy, Morgany, Poh Moi, Frank, JC & Tommy were able to make it today and already this group makes me feel confident about student care on local or overseas field trips. Many of us have had some first aid training, either formally or from field situations. However, our exposure to incidents have been relatively low (thankfully so)…
  • The future of evolutionary diversity in reef corals – Huang & Roy 2015

    otterman
    21 Jan 2015 | 6:31 pm
    Ted Webb alerted us this morning with this message, “Danwei has published an important paper in Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, that looks at threats and future losses of evolutionary diversity across the world’s coral reefs. (PS great use of skull and crossbones on Fig 1!).” Huang Danwei and Kaustuv Roy have published “The future of evolutionary diversity in reef corals” in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2014.0010 “One-third of the world’s reef-building corals are facing heightened extinction risk from…
  • Job: Field Assistant for Radio tracking civet project (deadline: 31 Jan 2015)

    otterman
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:31 pm
    Field Assistant required for a radiotracking project with translocated civets Januar – June 2015. Part time or Full time field assistant; pay: $10/hour Location: Central Catchment/MacRitchie Requirement: Physically fit, hiker, knowledge of trails and landscape at site Orienteering ability, Good hearing Owns a smartphone or GPS Preferably with access to car Contact Dr. Christina Colon at christinacolon@hotmail.com or call 8359-3747 Deadline 31 Jan 2015 Filed under: job
  • Job: Intern/part-time student assistants for common palm civet research project (deadline: 20 Jan 2015)

    otterman
    6 Jan 2015 | 1:25 am
    Project description: The diet and ecological role of the common palm civet in Pulau Ubin. An intern or part-time student assistant is required in the first half of 2015. Photo by Fung Tze Kwan Job Scope Sorting of common palm civet scats and identification of diet items. Preservation and storage of processed samples. Data entry. Assistance in field work and logistics e.g. radio-tracking and camera trapping as required. Requirements Applicant should be: Meticulous, responsible and careful with samples. Training will also be provided but experience in sorting is helpful. Self-motivated and able…
  • Job: 24-month Project Manager (freshwater ecology; deadline: 25 Jan 2014)

    otterman
    23 Dec 2014 | 9:18 am
    Project Manager with Freshwater and Invasion Biology Laboratory We are looking for a Full-time Research Fellow, or a Research Associate with relevant experience, to work in the Freshwater and Invasion Biology Laboratory for a 24 month period. Candidate with a PhD or MSc and prior experience in freshwater ecology and biology is preferred. Under the direction of the principal investigators, primary tasks will include: Field research in freshwater habitats involving fish, macro-invertebrate and plankton sampling Laboratory based work involving sorting and processing of specimens and data…
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • Hundreds of Thousands of BHL Images Available for Viewing and Tagging in Flickr

    29 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    BHL Images in the new IA Book Images Flickr StreamTwo Ways to Access BHL Images in Flickr Images from the books and journals of the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) are now more readily available in Flickr than ever before. Thanks to the work of researcher Kalev Leetaru and developers at Smithsonian Libraries (SIL), Missouri Botanical Garden (MBG), and the Internet Archive (IA), over 1 million images from BHL are being added to the IA's Book Images Flickr stream. This work began in the summer of 2014 when Leetaru extracted over 13 million images from 2 million IA public domain books…
  • Notes and News from BHL

    28 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    We are pleased to announce that the latest BHL Quarterly Report and Newsletter for Winter, 2015, are now available.You'll notice a new format for our Quarterly Reports and a new design for our newsletters.We're restructuring our Quarterly Reports as narratives detailing our quarterly activities and presenting content based on three themes: BHL Users, Member and Affiliate Activities, and Science. Our fourth Quarterly Report will constitute our BHL Annual Report, providing not only a report of the year's activities, but the statistics and program evaluations you've been accustomed to seeing in…
  • A Bridge to the Past: The Writings of William Brewster

    27 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
                William Brewster was a self-educated ornithologist who lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts. From the mid-1800s until his death in 1919, he amassed a tremendous specimen collection and became one of the foremost experts on birds in the northeastern United States. In 1906, the Nuttall Ornithological Club published The Birds of the Cambridge Region of Massachusetts, Brewster’s exhaustive work on the avian fauna of his own backyard. While the book is a valuable historical resource, it is Brewster’s journals and diaries—spanning over 50 years of his…
  • Wildflowers of Ecuador: Watercolors and eBooks

    22 Jan 2015 | 5:30 am
    Missouri Botanical Garden, Peter H. Raven Library's first eBook: Wildflowers and Landscapes of Ecuador: The Way We Knew It.Every now and then an unusual and exciting opportunity arises to digitize a very unique item. Such an opportunity arrived in the email box of Doug Holland, the director of the Peter H. Raven Library at the Missouri Botanical Garden, one afternoon in January 2014. Anne Hess, daughter of artist Mary Barnas Pomeroy and grand-daughter of artist/teacher Carl Barnas, had decided to donate a collection of artwork and her mother’s unfinished manuscript to the library. It was…
  • Planned BHL outage 1/21/15 at 5pm CST

    21 Jan 2015 | 4:42 am
    There will be a planned outage of the BHL website starting Wednesday 1/21 at 5pm Central (11pm GMT) to last approximately 2 hours. The 2 hour outage is an estimate, but we will work to have services restored as quickly as possible. Thank you for your patience.
 
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    Tales from Toriello

  • Come rain or shine, there is work to be done...

    Ian Hicken
    27 Jan 2015 | 12:43 pm
    We've had a couple of weeks of very mixed weather here in Asturias. One day bright sunshine and the next, torrential rain, hail and strong winds. There is snow in the mountains but at least here on the coast, that never causes us problems apart from the chill factor. The fields around us are flooded, there are several trees down and on the coast there has been damage to the promenades and tonnes of wood has been brought down stream in the swollen rivers and has now been deposited on the beaches.It is always depressing to see such a large volume of plastic amongst the wood on the beach. Why…
  • A new log burner for the workshop

    Ian Hicken
    22 Jan 2015 | 3:26 am
    The workshop (The Towers) is an important space for us.The old fireAmongst its many functions, it plays host to Luis' studio, a store room, a workshop to make and mend, a space for exercising in cooler weather and last but by no means least, a home for Wentworth and Gawber. When we had it built we designed it so it could, if necessary, be easily converted into self-contained accommodation. With the mezzanine floor it has approximately 75 sq m of floor space and a very high ceiling. We initially installed a cheap and cheerful wood burner that has served us well but that has always caused a few…
  • If you're looking for a new vegetable to grow or eat....

    Ian Hicken
    18 Jan 2015 | 7:17 am
    Look no further. Introducing the Kalette or as we know it, the flower sprout.We have been growing this winter crop for a couple of years now and are really pleased with the results.  According to the newspaper they are quite the latest fad amongst the celebrities and food fanatics boasting high levels of nutrients and vitamins. One reason perhaps why we should not grow them but... they really do taste great.This new vegetable was developed in the UK as a cross between brussel sprouts and kale, hence the name flower sprouts, now changed to kalette presumably to steer away from the sprout…
  • The forces of nature

    Ian Hicken
    15 Jan 2015 | 5:55 am
    Situated on a coastal plain we have the sea to the north and mountains to the south. We are vulnerable to weather fronts that come in from the Atlantic and Bay of Biscay or from the Picos de Europa mountain range. Following several warm and sunny days, today we are experiencing severe winds battering us from every direction with each new sequence of gusts growing stronger and increasingly forceful. I have been out and moved the most vulnerable of flower pots, watered smaller pots to give them weight and moved garden furniture to prevent damage occurring where possible.The uncollected fallen…
  • Thinning and pruning

    Ian Hicken
    9 Jan 2015 | 1:58 am
    We don't have a massive piece of land, about 1500 sq m in total but what we have is certainly enough to keep us busy throughout the year and especially in winter. When we bought La Pasera we asked the builder to leave in situ, the existing orchard trees and any trees and shrubs that were on our borders. One of the first tasks we accomplished was bringing plants from our garden in Yorkshire to Asturias, some of which were successful and others not. After creating various planting beds, rockeries and borders, adding our UK stock and planting more plants, trees and bushes over the years, we have…
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Write English well? Help get published someone who doesn’t

    CJAB
    27 Jan 2015 | 5:03 am
    I’ve written before about how sometimes I can feel a little exasperated by what seems to be a constant barrage of bad English from some of my co-authors. No, I’m not focussing solely on students, or even native English speakers for that matter. In fact, one of the best (English) science writers with whom I’ve […]
  • When human society breaks down, wildlife suffers

    CJAB
    21 Jan 2015 | 9:53 pm
    Global human society is a massive, consumptive beast that on average degrades its life-support system. As we’ve recently reported, this will only continue to get worse in the decades to centuries to come. Some have argued that as long as we can develop our societies enough, the impact of this massive demographic force can be lessened […]
  • It’s all about the variation, stupid

    CJAB
    11 Jan 2015 | 6:24 pm
    It is one of my long-suffering ecological quests to demonstrate to the buffoons in government and industry that you can’t simply offset deforestation by planting another forest elsewhere. While it sounds attractive, like carbon offsetting or even water neutrality, you can’t recreate a perfectly functioning, resilient native forest no matter how hard you try. I’m not for a moment […]
  • Help Hawaii’s hyper-threatened birds

    CJAB
    5 Jan 2015 | 5:01 pm
    You wouldn’t want to be a bird in Hawaii. There are more avian species threatened with extinction there than anywhere else in the USA. After humans arrived, some 70+ species have become extinct, and 31 are listed as threatened with extinction. In addition, 43% of 157 species are not native; among land birds, 69% are introduced species. […]
  • Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss XXVII

    CJAB
    30 Dec 2014 | 6:05 am
    Here are the last 6 biodiversity cartoons for 2014 because, well, why not? (see full stock of previous ‘Cartoon guide to biodiversity loss’ compendia here). – Filed under: biodiversity, cartoon, climate change, conservation Tagged: Anthropocene, biodiversity, cartoon, cartoons, climate change, corruption, deforestation, extinction, pollination, sustainability
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    Conservation

  • Shifting California forests reveal complex effects of drought

    Jason G. Goldman
    28 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    When it comes to understanding human impacts on forests, the first thing that springs to mind is probably logging. And while logging does leave a heavy footprint, it’s not the only anthropogenic activity that affects forest health. In California, ninety years worth of data shows that climate change is also stressing the state’s forests –
  • Citizen scientists find good news for Puget Sound seabirds

    Jason G. Goldman
    23 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    Seabirds have been suggested as critical “sentinel species,” indicators of overall ecosystem health, at least for coastal habitats. They’re often the best ways to see how well a given landscape is facing the threat of climate change and other human-related activities. One of the best ways to assess the health of seabird communities is through
  • Did the Soviet Union collapse harm wildlife?

    Roberta Kwok
    22 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    When a country goes into economic freefall, the resulting chaos can trigger a host of environmental changes. Wildlife regulation often falls by the wayside, and poaching rises — but activities such as logging may drop. “Thus, socioeconomic shocks may hinder or help conservation,” researchers write in Conservation Biology. In the case of the 1991 Soviet
  • Can there ever be a legal ivory trade?

    Jason G. Goldman
    21 Jan 2015 | 5:00 am
    The international trade in elephant ivory has doubled since 2007. Since 1998, it’s tripled. That’s despite the fact that, in 1989, trading ivory became illegal. There are many, many problems with the trade in ivory, but one of them comes down to basic economics: there is a mismatch between the demand for ivory and the quantity
  • Is there an optimal urbanization strategy?

    Dave Levitan
    20 Jan 2015 | 6:00 am
    Cities are going to get bigger. With more than half the world now living in urban areas, and that percentage growing steadily, that means the concrete and steel will have to stretch out into areas that are currently forest and farm and grass. But just letting that process happen without a plan is likely to
 
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