Biodiversity

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  • A strange gall, and an unexpected occupant

    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
    30 Aug 2015 | 6:18 pm
    A lush snarl of Green-headed Coneflower, Rudbeckia laciniata, colors the Junglebrook Marsh at Malabar Farm in Richland County, Ohio. I was up this way last Friday and Saturday to help with the 7th annual Flora-Quest, which was based out of Mohican State Park. We had a great time, and the event was superbly organized courtesy of Cheryl Harner, Paula Harper, and everyone else who was involved.Saturday's main activity was field trips at legendary Malabar Farm. I was stationed at a small wetland known as Junglebrook, along with some expert naturalists such as Lisa Rainsong, Judy Semroc, Mark…
  • Forests in the city

    CBD News Headlines
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Delhi can justifiably be proud of being among the greenest cities in India. According to the latest (2013) estimates of the Forest Survey of India, about 12.12 per cent of Delhi is under tree cover. This is still less than half of the national average of 21.23 per cent but significant nonetheless, given that Delhi is largely an urban agglomeration. Safeguarding the ridge forests all along the northern spur of the Aravallis has been an important part of this accomplishment. The Delhi Ridge, widely recognised as critical for the ecological security of the city, is officially protected from…
  • The RACE: SIZE MATTERS!

    Island Biodiversity Race
    islandbiodiversityrace
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:15 pm
    It is a fundamental tenet of the science of island biogeography that more different species of plants and animals will be found on larger islands than on smaller ones. When we say “larger” in this regard, we really mean surface area. Note that in the graphic illustration below right, both islands have the exactly the same circumference, but the lower island has a mountain in the middle of it which markedly increases any measure of its overall surface area. RCD construct. The greater (and more varied) the surface area, the larger the number of niches for living organisms; hence with time…
  • Rainforests doomed unless world adopts ‘development without destruction’, warn scientists

    Mongabay Environmental News
    Rhett Butler
    29 Aug 2015 | 8:02 am
    Tropical forests face a dire future unless humans adopt a radically different approach to protecting and managing them, warns a review published last week in the journal Science. The paper, published as part of a special series on global forests ahead of climate talks to be held in Paris, provides an overview of the past, present and future of tropical forests, including laying out the familiar pathway by which people transform diverse natural ecosystems into ecological wastelands. The path begins with selective logging, which opens up intact forest landscapes to hunters and additional…
  • Wed 26 Aug 2015: 11am @ CR2 – Francesca Louise Mcgrath on “Payments for ecosystem services and their impacts on social equity”

    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS
    otterman
    21 Aug 2015 | 7:49 pm
    Qualifying Exam Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore “Payments for ecosystem services and their impacts on social equity” Francesca Louise Mcgrath Graduate Student Supervisor: Asst Prof Carrasco T L Roman Wed 26 Aug 2015: 11.00 am Conference Room-II (S1-03 Mezzanine) All are welcome Abstract: Payments for Ecosystem (or Environmental) Services (PES) schemes, a form of market-based conservation, are an established method of using incentives to compensate individuals for the provision of goods and services provided through conservation of the…
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    Ohio Birds and Biodiversity

  • A strange gall, and an unexpected occupant

    30 Aug 2015 | 6:18 pm
    A lush snarl of Green-headed Coneflower, Rudbeckia laciniata, colors the Junglebrook Marsh at Malabar Farm in Richland County, Ohio. I was up this way last Friday and Saturday to help with the 7th annual Flora-Quest, which was based out of Mohican State Park. We had a great time, and the event was superbly organized courtesy of Cheryl Harner, Paula Harper, and everyone else who was involved.Saturday's main activity was field trips at legendary Malabar Farm. I was stationed at a small wetland known as Junglebrook, along with some expert naturalists such as Lisa Rainsong, Judy Semroc, Mark…
  • Rough Greensnake

    27 Aug 2015 | 7:37 pm
    I visited Chillicothe, Ohio, last Monday evening, to deliver a presentation to the Scioto Valley Bird & Nature Club. It's always a treat to visit this city, which is steeped in Ohio history. Chillicothe was our first capital, and then after a brief peregrination to Zanesville for two years, it again served as capital for about five more years. In 1816 the legislature voted to shift the capital north to Columbus, my hometown, and for better or worse it's been the same ever since.Chillicothe's home county of Ross is incredibly biodiverse. The Appalachian foothills taper out into the…
  • A morning spent slaying dragons

    23 Aug 2015 | 7:28 pm
    Jim Lemon scans for dragonflies along an old quarry in Champaign County, Ohio. Lemon, a former IT guru returned to his entomological roots, made an outstanding discovery here last year. He found the state's first record of an exquisite dragonfly known as the Swift Setwing, Dythemis velox.This is a southern species that has been actively expanding its range northward. Nonetheless, prior to Jim's find, the nearest populations to Ohio were about 200 miles south and west, in southern Indiana and adjacent Illinois.As soon as I heard about these setwings, I wanted to see them (of course!). It never…
  • Some shorebirds, at Funk

    19 Aug 2015 | 9:46 pm
    Mudflats and shallow pools blanket the landscape just south of Funk Bottoms Wildlife Area in Wayne County, along the north side of Wilderness Road. An active peat mining operation has temporarily created good shorebird habitat, and reports of shorebirds have been coming in from this area for a few weeks. Last Sunday, I was finally able to get to this spot and observe some waders, and make a few images.Great views of the birds can be had from the dike running along the east side of the wetlands, but a spotting scope is highly useful. The photography conditions are OK, but not great. For the…
  • Ohio Sustainable Landscapes Symposium - September 12

    17 Aug 2015 | 6:08 pm
    If you're reading this blog, you probably like plants, and enjoy learning more about how plants spawn animal life. The Ohio Sustainable Landscapes Symposium is for you. Mark your calendars for Saturday, September 12th, and prepare for a pleasant trip to one of the Midwest's premier plant collections, the beautiful Dawes Arboretum near Newark, Ohio. They've lined up an excellent slate of speakers, lecturing on a useful array of topics. You can see all of the details in the flyer below.I recently wrote about the installation of an urban prairie and the resultant massive spike in…
 
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    CBD News Headlines

  • Forests in the city

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Delhi can justifiably be proud of being among the greenest cities in India. According to the latest (2013) estimates of the Forest Survey of India, about 12.12 per cent of Delhi is under tree cover. This is still less than half of the national average of 21.23 per cent but significant nonetheless, given that Delhi is largely an urban agglomeration. Safeguarding the ridge forests all along the northern spur of the Aravallis has been an important part of this accomplishment. The Delhi Ridge, widely recognised as critical for the ecological security of the city, is officially protected from…
  • Gabon: protecting vital forests, and communities

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    The west African nation is working to balance competing demands of retaining biodiversity and mitigating climate change with the immediate needs of its people.
  • Climate change in everyday life

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    Photographer James Whitlow Delano runs Everyday Climate Change, a successful Instagram feed. It's the best way to reach people, he says. Today, the feed features the work of photographers from all over the world.
  • Climate change legislation approaches pivotal showdown with oil industry

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    California Democrats' push to curb emissions and promote clean energy would alter how the state does business and change the way residents live.
  • Ancient crops to be deposited in Norway's Arctic seed vault for future generations - UN

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:00 pm
    As a significant step towards preserving the world's most important ancient crops for future generations, the head of the United Nations agriculture agency, together with scientists and delegations from Peru, Costa Rica and Norway, today witnessed a ceremony during which potato seeds were deposited to the "safety box" in Arctic seed vault.
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    Island Biodiversity Race

  • The RACE: SIZE MATTERS!

    islandbiodiversityrace
    4 Aug 2015 | 5:15 pm
    It is a fundamental tenet of the science of island biogeography that more different species of plants and animals will be found on larger islands than on smaller ones. When we say “larger” in this regard, we really mean surface area. Note that in the graphic illustration below right, both islands have the exactly the same circumference, but the lower island has a mountain in the middle of it which markedly increases any measure of its overall surface area. RCD construct. The greater (and more varied) the surface area, the larger the number of niches for living organisms; hence with time…
  • The Race: More New Species, More New Science

    islandbiodiversityrace
    20 May 2015 | 12:03 pm
    After a reconnaissance by me in 2000, our island expeditions began with the very first in 2001; there were 12 scientists and their students on GG I, and some of us remained in the islands for over two months. Fieldwork, especially in this island paradise goes quickly but the actual science takes time, and it is heartening that this very first expedition (of eight!) is still yielding results. There were two arachnologists (spider specialists) on GG I: Dr. Charles Griswold of the Academy and his graduate student Joel Ledford of the University of California, Berkeley (now Dr. Ledford).  Charles…
  • The Race: The Blog Returns with a Science Update

    islandbiodiversityrace
    1 Apr 2015 | 3:49 pm
    “The Race” has been silent for a while; a sabbatical accompanied by computer glitches at both sites (Wildlifedirect.org; calacademy.org) led to it, but this was not meant to signal a pause in our island work by any means! We will be returning to the islands for two more expeditions later this year. During the past nine months or so, some important scientific papers have been published by expedition members; these continue to illustrate the unique nature of the island fauna and flora. Ricka Stoelting (D. Lin phot, GGI) Ricka Stoelting was on the islands for a solid two months…
  • THE RACE: GULF OF GUINEA VIII NEARS COMPLETION

    islandbiodiversityrace
    29 Apr 2014 | 11:55 am
    Our eighth expedition has been a very different one; except for GG V this has been our only all-education mission.  Readers will recall that our biodiversity awareness program began in 2010 when we assessed the curriculum for biology in school across both islands. Then we began annual distribution of educational materials to a cohort of 2,000 third graders in widely separated schools on both islands.  These kids are now in the fifth grade and will move on to different schools next year, so this has been our last meeting with them. Below are a series of images of our activities over the past…
  • The Race: The Amphibians of Sao Tome and Principe, and the Expeditionion

    islandbiodiversityrace
    5 Mar 2014 | 1:59 pm
    The Biodiversity Education team has been hard at work on our product for GG VIII, of April, 2014.  The 2000 students we have been visiting since the 3rd grade are now in the 5th grade and will be moving on next year, so this is our last visit with them.  We have produced a slightly more technical biodiversity booklet (livreto) for each of them. This cohort represents slightly more than 35% of the island studentsin their age group.  NOSSAS PLANTAS  E ANIMAIS ESPECIAIS The Bio-education team in my Lab: Roberta Ayers (senior educator, and translation – on Skype), Velma Schnoll (Project…
 
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    Mongabay Environmental News

  • Rainforests doomed unless world adopts ‘development without destruction’, warn scientists

    Rhett Butler
    29 Aug 2015 | 8:02 am
    Tropical forests face a dire future unless humans adopt a radically different approach to protecting and managing them, warns a review published last week in the journal Science. The paper, published as part of a special series on global forests ahead of climate talks to be held in Paris, provides an overview of the past, present and future of tropical forests, including laying out the familiar pathway by which people transform diverse natural ecosystems into ecological wastelands. The path begins with selective logging, which opens up intact forest landscapes to hunters and additional…
  • 400+ dams could irrevocably harm Amazon ecology — but solutions exist

    Glenn Scherer
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:54 am
    Dams and reservoirs affect fish and other riverine fauna by creating barriers to movement, both upstream and downstream. Many fish in the Amazon migrate thousands of miles as part of their life cycle, a journey that can involve complex patterns of movement through river flows and flood plains. Migrating fish often move upstream from black-water and clear-water flows in the Amazon Basin to spawn in whitewater reaches in the Andean headwaters. In Brazil, the list of fish that make this journey includes most, if not all, commercially valuable species, in terms of nutrition and economics, such as…
  • The many paths towards sustainable palm oil in India

    Morgan Erickson-Davis
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:50 am
    This is the second of a two-part series on palm oil in India. Read the first part here. Love it or hate it, palm oil is likely here to stay. It is the cheapest edible oil to produce, refine and purchase, and a key ingredient in thousands of products, ranging from lipstick to packaged bread. It’s also increasingly in demand. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, global palm oil production grew 20 percent between 2010 and 2014. This uptick in popularity has contributed to widespread deforestation in Indonesia and Malaysia and increased greenhouse gas emissions, among other social…
  • Indonesian village opts to protect mangroves, preserve livelihoods

    Philip Jacobson
    28 Aug 2015 | 10:05 am
    Preserving mangrove forests is instrumental to bringing down emissions rates in Indonesia, a leading carbon polluter. Residents of Deaga village in North Sulawesi province also believe it is key to safeguarding their economy. In May, the village agreed to conserve 150 hectares of mangroves its residents depend on for their livelihoods. The conservation zone was split into four sites, some of which include coral reefs. “The destruction of the mangroves is increasingly threatening the sustainability of coastal and marine resources and their ability to support the people,” said Ruslani…
  • Hundreds of new Amazon dams an “ecological experiment” on global scale

    Glenn Scherer
    27 Aug 2015 | 1:50 pm
    A boom in dam construction is sweeping the Neotropical regions of the world. In the Amazon, the world’s largest and arguably most ecologically important river basin, hundreds of dams and reservoirs are on the drawing boards for the next few decades. Nearly every country in the region is drafting construction scenarios that in all will involve at least five of the river’s six major tributaries. Brazil, with the largest portion of the Amazon, is leading the charge. The country has put forth plans to build at least 58 dams in the near future, including a massive and controversial project…
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    The Biodiversity Crew @ NUS

  • Wed 26 Aug 2015: 11am @ CR2 – Francesca Louise Mcgrath on “Payments for ecosystem services and their impacts on social equity”

    otterman
    21 Aug 2015 | 7:49 pm
    Qualifying Exam Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore “Payments for ecosystem services and their impacts on social equity” Francesca Louise Mcgrath Graduate Student Supervisor: Asst Prof Carrasco T L Roman Wed 26 Aug 2015: 11.00 am Conference Room-II (S1-03 Mezzanine) All are welcome Abstract: Payments for Ecosystem (or Environmental) Services (PES) schemes, a form of market-based conservation, are an established method of using incentives to compensate individuals for the provision of goods and services provided through conservation of the…
  • Interns for documentary team filming Singapore’s wildlife (1 – 3 months)

    otterman
    28 Jul 2015 | 11:57 pm
    Claire Clements from Beach House Pictures who made Wild City is looking for a couple of interns for their latest wildlife documentary filmed here in Singapore about Singapore’s wildlife. She says, Beach House Pictures is offering a paid internship (1 – 3 months) working on our latest wildlife documentaries! This is a great opportunity for young nature lovers to get involved, have input and get some great experience in a very niche industry. Please note if you are studying and cannot commit to full time but would like to be involved we could potentially hire you as a part term…
  • Wed 05 Aug 2015: 4.15pm @ DBS CF2 – Greg Rouse on “Queens of Decay, Osedax bone worms and whalefalls”

    otterman
    28 Jul 2015 | 8:28 pm
    The biology, life history and phylogeny of Osedax, deep-sea siboglinid polychaetes (boneworms, bone-eating or zombie worms) which bore into bones of whale carcasses to feed on lipids. Click for pdf Filed under: talks
  • Wed 05 Aug 2015: 2.00pm @ NUS DBS CR2 – Helen Nash on the “Ecology, genetics and conservation of pangolins”

    otterman
    23 Jul 2015 | 8:12 pm
    Qualifying Examination Department of Biological Sciences National University of Singapore “Ecology, genetics and conservation of pangolins” Helen Nash Graduate Student, NUS Biological Sciences Wed 05 Aug 2015: 2.00pm @ Conference Room-II (S1 Level 3, mezzanine) Supervisor: Assoc Prof Evans, Theodore Alfred Abstract: Mammal species in East and SE Asia are at the highest risk of extinction for mammals anywhere in the world. Of this select group, the ant and termite eating scaly pangolins (Family Pholidota) are particularly threatened. Pangolin populations are in severe decline in…
  • Neo Mei Lin, marine biologist, featured on Women’s Weekly

    otterman
    23 Jul 2015 | 6:50 pm
    Neo Mei Lin says, “I am honoured to be nominated by The Singapore Women’s Weekly for this award, and had a chance to see what’s like behind the scenes of fashion, makeup and glam. I couldn’t ask for more as I already feel like a winner! I hope my interview reaches out to a different audience, and for them to see what’s like to be a marine biologist and environmentalist.” Courtesy of The Singapore Women’s Weekly, August 2015. In a similar vein, see: “Marcus Chua (Systematics and Ecology Lab) in Her World magazine.” Aug 2012 link “Women…
 
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    Biodiversity Heritage Library

  • Smorball and Beanstalk: Games that aren’t just fun to play but help science too

    28 Aug 2015 | 5:30 am
    As game players are growing beanstalks and leading the Eugene Mellonballers to victory, historic books are being saved from digital oblivion. In June of 2015, the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) and Tiltfactor released two games called Smorball and Beanstalk to help crowdsource the task of text correction.What’s the Purpose? When a book is first digitized, its pages are merely image files and the text cannot be searched. Optical character recognition software (OCR) converts these page images into machine encoded text that can be searched, but historic literature has many…
  • Brilliant and Remarkable Birds of Brazil

    27 Aug 2015 | 5:30 am
    One of the joyous things about being a Librarian caring for special and rare collections is that you frequently find something remarkable and new to you in those collections. Add on the role of BHL staffer and this multiplies through digitization requests posted by users of BHL.Approximately five years ago a request was posted for a book unknown to me by an artist I had not come across. The catalogue record flagged that it was a folio of coloured plates which consigned the volume to a long queue for bespoke in-house scanning. Time passed and circumstances changed, and earlier this year I was…
  • Beyond Shells: The Birth of Malacology

    20 Aug 2015 | 5:30 am
    Until the late 18th century, the study of mollusks was based largely on shells. Very little research or published information existed about molluscan anatomy and soft tissues. Giuseppe Saverio Poli, recognized by many as the father of malacology, changed this with his monumental publication, Testacea utriusque Siciliae eorumque historia et anatome (1791-1827).Poli, born in 1746 in Molfetta, Italy, studied classics, theology, and natural sciences at the University of Padua. In 1774, he traveled to London during an appointment at the Royal Military Academy, where he met physician and…
  • Historic Field Diaries from BHL Australia Now in BHL!

    18 Aug 2015 | 5:30 am
    This post was originally published on the Museum Victoria Blog. See the original post here.By Nicole KearneyCoordinator | Biodiversity Heritage Library AustraliaIn November 2014, Museum Victoria started a project to digitize and transcribe the field diaries in our collection. These diaries, handwritten by Australia's early field naturalists long before the days of electronic notetaking, are rich in scientific data and historic detail. They provide insights into past species distribution and abundance, as well as the trials and wonders experienced on historic expeditions.Afternoon tea with…
  • The Tarantupedia, an online encyclopaedia for the biggest spiders in the world

    13 Aug 2015 | 5:30 am
    Tarantulas are amazing. Not only do they include the largest of all spiders, with some species reaching a legspan the size of a dinner plate, but they are arguably some of the most beautiful too. While famous for giants that inhabit the jungles of South America, some species barely grow larger than your thumb nail. Some species live on trees in damp forests while others live in self-constructed tubular burrows in the ground in some of the most inhospitable deserts. Some have special protective hairs on their bodies which cause extreme itching when they come into contact with the mucous…
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    Under The Banyan

  • A fig tree swallowing a warehouse

    mike shanahan
    21 Aug 2015 | 5:12 am
    Roots ooze through windows and cracks between bricks. They pour down walls and pool on the floor. They entwine with remnant beams from the roof their weight has crushed. They seal once-busy doorways and claim the rooms they hide. It’s a strangler fig in action, engulfing an entire building in Taiwan. I’m always on the […]
  • Going dotty about fig trees: Ancient and imagined images of the world’s most fascinating trees

    mike shanahan
    19 Aug 2015 | 4:40 am
    I want to share some photos of the illustrations I am creating for my book Ladders to Heaven: How fig trees shaped our history, fed our imaginations and can enrich our future…. (watch a short video about the book, read an extract or order a copy, here) . The pictures below are not finished but they […]
  • Snakes and ladders and tantalising figs

    mike shanahan
    29 Apr 2015 | 1:22 pm
    … an extract from the prologue of my book Ladders to Heaven: How fig trees shaped our history, fed our imaginations and can enrich our future. The figs were big orange beacons that lured me from afar. The snake was lime green and venomous and just centimetres from my face. I met them both near […]
  • A thousand murders, a thousand stories to tell

    mike shanahan
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:58 am
    Bancha Noppawong is a very rare kind of man, simply because we know his name. He hit the headlines in October 2000, in Phuket, Thailand, when he drove a pick-up truck into a motorbike and knocked the two people on it into the road. The passenger, an 18-year old woman, sustained minor injuries to her […]
  • Announcing my book: Ladders to Heaven

    mike shanahan
    5 Mar 2015 | 9:50 am
    I have spent the past ten years writing a book about an extraordinary group of plants that have affected humanity in profound yet little-known ways. I am therefore delighted to announce today that Unbound will publish Ladders to Heaven: How fig trees shaped our history, fed our imaginations and can enrich our future. These trees […]
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    Tales from Toriello

  • A high summer peek at the garden

    Ian Hicken
    30 Aug 2015 | 6:39 am
    Most gardens have several faces that are determined either by natural cycles or through their purpose and the resources allocated. Ours is no different. We have beautiful places that are pleasing to the eye and other senses where you can sit and idle the time away. We have both tidy and not so tidy working areas which are in a constant state of flux, piled high with wood to chop or stone to cut and use. We have unfinished areas that are at the end of a list that grew and grew over the past 9 years and that will one day on completion, serve as the full stop to the overall preparation and build…
  • August update from La Pasera

    Ian Hicken
    24 Aug 2015 | 2:10 pm
    It's been a busy month. A couple of visits, a family wedding, a family barbecue, lots of work around the vegetable plot and garden, some building work, a street market to prepare for and stand, and...a few preserving and jam making jobs.Luis' brother Oscar came to stay with us from El Salvador and besides valuing his help with one or two DIY jobs it was good to hear about his life as a Marist Brother teaching in El Salvador. He have previously been living up the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela so this recent move is quite a change for him.Another brother of Luis, Ruben, got married to his long…
  • Garden shed clearing - out with the old, in with the new.

    Ian Hicken
    16 Aug 2015 | 10:26 am
    Every gardener knows that the garden shed is worth it's weight in crops as long as it is kept tidy and ordered. There is nothing worse than not being able to find your trowel, spend 15 minutes digging around for the hormone rooting powder or stumbling over the mound of unwashed plastic pots that litter the floor. Unfortunately we are as guilty as many for not keeping this precious work space as pristine as it could be. The potting table on the side of the shed was deteriorating fast and the whole shed beckoned for a little tender loving care.The garden shed was one of the first things we…
  • Walking in Asturias: Collado Jermoso refuge

    Ian Hicken
    9 Aug 2015 | 7:10 am
    My last outing with the Peña Santa mountain walking group was one of the most memorable walks in the Picos Mountains National Park I have so far had. It was a two day walk with an over night stay at Collado Jermoso refuge, one of the several manned mountain refuges dotted across the National Park.Only 15 members of the group undertook this particular walk which entailed a two hour journey via a small minibus that could pass the small roads that would take us past the stunning scenery of the Beyos Gorge and El Ponton mountain pass before we could reach the start of our hike in the…
  • The holiday season in Asturias

    Ian Hicken
    2 Aug 2015 | 8:54 am
    Asturias is a popular destination during the heat of the summer in Spain. Many Spanish people come during the main holiday period of last two weeks of July, August and beginning of September. Many leave their town and city based apartments where the summer temperatures rarely fall below 30 degrees Celsius, to come to the milder and more tolerable northern coast; Spain's Natural Paradise, Asturias.The once quiet towns and low-key cities now buzz with extra traffic, more pedestrians and busy terrace cafes and bars. The beaches that are mainly deserted for 10 months of the year become a mosaic…
 
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    ConservationBytes.com

  • Challenging the traditional conference model

    CJAB
    27 Aug 2015 | 3:30 pm
    An interesting take on conference culture by Diogo Veríssimo (mastermind behind I Fucking Love Biodiversity). — Just a few weeks back, more than 2000 conservationists got together in Montpellier, France, for the 27th International Congress on Conservation Biology (ICCB). I have been attending these conferences since 2008, and once again had a blast. Yet as I […]
  • What conservationists should recommend to philanthropists

    CJAB
    23 Aug 2015 | 1:52 pm
    It probably won’t come as too much of a surprise that most of the people I know reasonably well (mates included) are also scientists of some description. I therefore think that I fall into the extremely normal and mundane category of associating the most with people at work. Sure, I’ve also got very good mates […]
  • How to give a scientific presentation

    CJAB
    14 Aug 2015 | 3:42 pm
    Having just attended the joint 27th International Congress for Conservation Biology / 4th European Congress for Conservation Biology in Montpellier, France, I have a renewed vigour for proffering advice on the DOs and DO NOTs of giving a scientific presentation. There are of course many different styles, formats, media and audiences for scientific presentations, so I’m going […]
  • Scariest part of climate change isn’t what we know, but what we don’t

    CJAB
    6 Aug 2015 | 2:08 pm
    My good friend and tropical conservation rockstar, Bill Laurance, just emailed me and asked if I could repost his recent The Conversation article here on ConservationBytes.com. He said: It’s going completely viral (26,000 reads so far) in just three days. It’s been republished in The Ecologist, I Fucking Love Science, and several other big media outlets. Several […]
  • All (fisheries) models are wrong, but some are useful (to indigenous people)

    CJAB
    1 Aug 2015 | 6:36 am
    Another post from Alejandro Frid. (Note: title modified from George Box‘s most excellent quote). — As an ecologist working for indigenous people of coastal British Columbia, western Canada, I live at the interface of two worlds. On the one hand, I know that computer models can be important management tools. On the other hand, my […]
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    Conservation

  • Faced with bad weather, female seabirds keep fishing

    Jason G. Goldman
    28 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    Climate change discussions are typically dominated by temperature, with ocean acidification as a close second. But those winds are slowly changing—literally. In some places, winds are expected to become slower, while in others, winds are expected to pick up or switch direction. One group of animals that’s particularly susceptible to the bluster of wind is coastal
  • Wildflowers help control crop pests

    Roberta Kwok
    27 Aug 2015 | 5:55 am
    Could cornflowers and poppies take the place of pesticides? That’s what researchers are proposing in a new study on wheat fields. By planting strips of wildflowers alongside the crops, the scientists found that they could encourage the presence of helpful bugs that eat pests. The study addresses what the authors call one of the “biggest
  • Spying on terrestrial politics from space

    Jason G. Goldman
    26 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    That the Middle East has been a hotbed of political and economic upheaval in recent years is not particularly newsworthy, but rarely considered is the role that the geopolitical climate has on the environmental one. The typical pattern is fairly straightforward and makes a good deal of intuitive sense: as a nation gains in economic
  • Return of devil could aid small mammals in Australia

    Sarah DeWeerdt
    25 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    Ecologically speaking, Australia is a bit like a crazy quilt, a patchwork of globally unique fauna overlain by the effects of two waves of human settlement (first by Aboriginal people and later European colonists), accidental introductions of invasive species, deliberate but often ill-advised introductions of others, and still other species driven out. Now, researchers from
  • What made humans into global super predators?

    Jason G. Goldman
    21 Aug 2015 | 5:00 am
    In the 1970s, Thomas Reimchen sat near a remote Canadian lake. The biologist soon realized that a wide variety of animals – loons, trout, grebes, and otters – all fed on the same prey species, stickleback fish. And the predators overwhelmingly targeted the juvenile and sub-adult fish, or what Reimchen calls the “reproductive interest.” Only
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